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Important 4 all: diffrent contact lens materials; FDA classification

This is a discussion on Important 4 all: diffrent contact lens materials; FDA classification within the Daily Disposable Contact Lenses forums; FDA gives each contact lens a generic name. In general, all silicon hydrogel lens generic ...


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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-27-2011, 03:39 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Freshman
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 14
Default Important 4 all: diffrent contact lens materials; FDA classification

FDA gives each contact lens a generic name. In general, all silicon hydrogel lens generic names end in the suffix "filcon" and all non-hydrogel lenses end in "focon"

Hydrogel lenses are categorized into four groupings for purposes of evaluating effects of accessory products upon the lens material. Lenses with less than 50 percent water content are considered to be "low water" and the others are "high water." Less reactive surfaces are termed "non-ionic" and more reactive materials are labeled "ionic."
There are four types of contact lens materials in use today:
F D A Group I (low water, nonionic),
FDA Group II (high wat e r, nonionic),
FDA Group III (low water, ionic),
and FDA Group IV (high water, ionic).
the tear protein adherence depends on the ionic or nonionic nature of the contact lenses. It was also shown that high water ionic (Group IV) lenses accumulate more protein over time than low water nonionic (Group I) lenses.
This difference is probably due to the affinity of lysozyme for negative charges on the contact lens material.

Group 1

Low Water (<50% H20)
Nonionic Polymers


Teflicon (38%) (Dk = 8.9)
Tetrafilcon A (43%) (Dk = 9)
Crofilcon (38%) (Dk = 13)
Hefilcon A&B (45%) (Dk = 12)
Mafilcom (33%) (Dk = 4)
Polymacon (38%) (Dk = 9)
Hioxifilcon B (49%) (Dk = 15)
Lotrafilcon A (24%) (Dk = 140)

Group 2
High Water (>50% H20)
Nonionic Polymers

Lidofilcon B (79%) (Dk = 38)
Surfilcon A (74%) (Dk = 35)
Lidofilcon A (70%) (Dk = 31)
Netrafilcon A (65%) (Dk = 34.5)
Hefilcon C (57%)
Alfafilcon A (66%) (Dk = 32)
Omafilcon A (59%) (Dk = 33)
Vasurfilcon A (74%) (Dk = 39.1)
Hioxifilcon A (59%) (Dk = 36)
Nelfilcon A (69%) (Dk = 26)
Hilafilcon A (70%) (Dk = 35)
Hilafilcon B (59%) (Dk = 22)

Group 3
Low Water (<50% H20)
Ionic Polymers

Bufilcon A (45%) (Dk = 16)
Deltafilcon A (43%) (Dk = 10)
Phemfilcon (38%) (Dk = 9)

Group 4
High Water (>50% H20)
Ionic Polymers

Bufilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Perfilcon A (71%) (Dk = 34)
Etafilcon A (58%) (Dk = 28)
Focofilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon B (53%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon C (55%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon D (55%) (Dk = 19.7)
Ocufilcon E (65%) (Dk = 22)
Ocufilcon F (60%) (Dk = 24.3)
Phemfilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Methafilcon A (55%) (Dk = 18)
Methafilcon B (55%) (Dk = 18)
Vilfilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 07-27-2011, 09:47 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 467
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hudda View Post
FDA gives each contact lens a generic name. In general, all silicon hydrogel lens generic names end in the suffix "filcon" and all non-hydrogel lenses end in "focon"

Hydrogel lenses are categorized into four groupings for purposes of evaluating effects of accessory products upon the lens material. Lenses with less than 50 percent water content are considered to be "low water" and the others are "high water." Less reactive surfaces are termed "non-ionic" and more reactive materials are labeled "ionic."
There are four types of contact lens materials in use today:
F D A Group I (low water, nonionic),
FDA Group II (high water, nonionic),
FDA Group III (low water, ionic),
and FDA Group IV (high water, ionic).
the tear protein adherence depends on the ionic or nonionic nature of the contact lenses. It was also shown that high water ionic (Group IV) lenses accumulate more protein over time than low water nonionic (Group I) lenses.
This difference is probably due to the affinity of lysozyme for negative charges on the contact lens material.
Did you get all that everybody? That stuff about ionic polymers? Do you think that this information is useful for regular contact lens customers? Did you read the entire posting, or did you do like I did and read the first paragraph before skimming through the rest?

This might be a good posting to have on hand for reference, for example if you need to remember if it was the high water ionic or the low water ionic contact lenses that accumulated more protein. It would come in handy for that.
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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 11-23-2011, 04:54 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 546
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jawa View Post
Did you get all that everybody? That stuff about ionic polymers? Do you think that this information is useful for regular contact lens customers? Did you read the entire posting, or did you do like I did and read the first paragraph before skimming through the rest?
When I saw that most of that post was in columns and consisted of numbers, I just scrolled down.
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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-12-2011, 10:08 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 489
Default Say What Now?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hudda View Post
FDA gives each contact lens a generic name. In general, all silicon hydrogel lens generic names end in the suffix "filcon" and all non-hydrogel lenses end in "focon"

Hydrogel lenses are categorized into four groupings for purposes of evaluating effects of accessory products upon the lens material. Lenses with less than 50 percent water content are considered to be "low water" and the others are "high water." Less reactive surfaces are termed "non-ionic" and more reactive materials are labeled "ionic."
There are four types of contact lens materials in use today:
F D A Group I (low water, nonionic),
FDA Group II (high wat e r, nonionic),
FDA Group III (low water, ionic),
and FDA Group IV (high water, ionic).
the tear protein adherence depends on the ionic or nonionic nature of the contact lenses. It was also shown that high water ionic (Group IV) lenses accumulate more protein over time than low water nonionic (Group I) lenses.
This difference is probably due to the affinity of lysozyme for negative charges on the contact lens material.

Group 1

Low Water (<50% H20)
Nonionic Polymers


Teflicon (38%) (Dk = 8.9)
Tetrafilcon A (43%) (Dk = 9)
Crofilcon (38%) (Dk = 13)
Hefilcon A&B (45%) (Dk = 12)
Mafilcom (33%) (Dk = 4)
Polymacon (38%) (Dk = 9)
Hioxifilcon B (49%) (Dk = 15)
Lotrafilcon A (24%) (Dk = 140)

Group 2
High Water (>50% H20)
Nonionic Polymers

Lidofilcon B (79%) (Dk = 38)
Surfilcon A (74%) (Dk = 35)
Lidofilcon A (70%) (Dk = 31)
Netrafilcon A (65%) (Dk = 34.5)
Hefilcon C (57%)
Alfafilcon A (66%) (Dk = 32)
Omafilcon A (59%) (Dk = 33)
Vasurfilcon A (74%) (Dk = 39.1)
Hioxifilcon A (59%) (Dk = 36)
Nelfilcon A (69%) (Dk = 26)
Hilafilcon A (70%) (Dk = 35)
Hilafilcon B (59%) (Dk = 22)

Group 3
Low Water (<50% H20)
Ionic Polymers

Bufilcon A (45%) (Dk = 16)
Deltafilcon A (43%) (Dk = 10)
Phemfilcon (38%) (Dk = 9)

Group 4
High Water (>50% H20)
Ionic Polymers

Bufilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Perfilcon A (71%) (Dk = 34)
Etafilcon A (58%) (Dk = 28)
Focofilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon B (53%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon C (55%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon D (55%) (Dk = 19.7)
Ocufilcon E (65%) (Dk = 22)
Ocufilcon F (60%) (Dk = 24.3)
Phemfilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Methafilcon A (55%) (Dk = 18)
Methafilcon B (55%) (Dk = 18)
Vilfilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
How about some brand names people can ask their doctor for? I can imagine someone going to see their doctor with a little slip of paper and asking "do you have anything that's boo . . . fil . . . bufilcon A fifty five percent dk equals sixteen?" and then looking up at the doctor expectantly.
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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-05-2012, 03:24 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 546
Default I Can See It

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryTamm2 View Post
How about some brand names people can ask their doctor for? I can imagine someone going to see their doctor with a little slip of paper and asking "do you have anything that's boo . . . fil . . . bufilcon A fifty five percent dk equals sixteen?" and then looking up at the doctor expectantly.
That's quite a word picture you paint, MaryTamm2. Especially the last part.
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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 01-11-2012, 10:26 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Senior
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 317
Default Ask For Them By Name

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryTamm2 View Post
How about some brand names people can ask their doctor for?
That's a great idea, Mary.
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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2012, 02:39 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 546
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryTamm2 View Post
How about some brand names people can ask their doctor for? I can imagine someone going to see their doctor with a little slip of paper and asking "do you have anything that's boo . . . fil . . . bufilcon A fifty five percent dk equals sixteen?" and then looking up at the doctor expectantly.
Yeah, brand names would be good. Maybe even some pictures of boxes.
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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2012, 03:06 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 435
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hudda View Post
FDA gives each contact lens a generic name. In general, all silicon hydrogel lens generic names end in the suffix "filcon" and all non-hydrogel lenses end in "focon"

Hydrogel lenses are categorized into four groupings for purposes of evaluating effects of accessory products upon the lens material. Lenses with less than 50 percent water content are considered to be "low water" and the others are "high water." Less reactive surfaces are termed "non-ionic" and more reactive materials are labeled "ionic."
There are four types of contact lens materials in use today:
F D A Group I (low water, nonionic),
FDA Group II (high wat e r, nonionic),
FDA Group III (low water, ionic),
and FDA Group IV (high water, ionic).
the tear protein adherence depends on the ionic or nonionic nature of the contact lenses. It was also shown that high water ionic (Group IV) lenses accumulate more protein over time than low water nonionic (Group I) lenses.
This difference is probably due to the affinity of lysozyme for negative charges on the contact lens material.

Group 1

Low Water (<50% H20)
Nonionic Polymers


Teflicon (38%) (Dk = 8.9)
Tetrafilcon A (43%) (Dk = 9)
Crofilcon (38%) (Dk = 13)
Hefilcon A&B (45%) (Dk = 12)
Mafilcom (33%) (Dk = 4)
Polymacon (38%) (Dk = 9)
Hioxifilcon B (49%) (Dk = 15)
Lotrafilcon A (24%) (Dk = 140)

Group 2
High Water (>50% H20)
Nonionic Polymers

Lidofilcon B (79%) (Dk = 38)
Surfilcon A (74%) (Dk = 35)
Lidofilcon A (70%) (Dk = 31)
Netrafilcon A (65%) (Dk = 34.5)
Hefilcon C (57%)
Alfafilcon A (66%) (Dk = 32)
Omafilcon A (59%) (Dk = 33)
Vasurfilcon A (74%) (Dk = 39.1)
Hioxifilcon A (59%) (Dk = 36)
Nelfilcon A (69%) (Dk = 26)
Hilafilcon A (70%) (Dk = 35)
Hilafilcon B (59%) (Dk = 22)

Group 3
Low Water (<50% H20)
Ionic Polymers

Bufilcon A (45%) (Dk = 16)
Deltafilcon A (43%) (Dk = 10)
Phemfilcon (38%) (Dk = 9)

Group 4
High Water (>50% H20)
Ionic Polymers

Bufilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Perfilcon A (71%) (Dk = 34)
Etafilcon A (58%) (Dk = 28)
Focofilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon B (53%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon C (55%) (Dk = 16)
Ocufilcon D (55%) (Dk = 19.7)
Ocufilcon E (65%) (Dk = 22)
Ocufilcon F (60%) (Dk = 24.3)
Phemfilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Methafilcon A (55%) (Dk = 18)
Methafilcon B (55%) (Dk = 18)
Vilfilcon A (55%) (Dk = 16)
Do you know what the letters "TMI" stand for, hudda?
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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2012, 09:36 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 718
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John316 View Post
Do you know what the letters "TMI" stand for, hudda?
Not too much info for me. I found the information helpful. And for people having problems with their eyes not getting enough oxygen, it's probably very useful. Fortunately, I'm not one of them, but you never know. One day I might be, and I'd be grateful to know if a lens I'm considering had a high Dk or not.
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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2012, 01:21 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: US
Posts: 426
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamrocker View Post
Not too much info for me. I found the information helpful. And for people having problems with their eyes not getting enough oxygen, it's probably very useful. Fortunately, I'm not one of them, but you never know. One day I might be, and I'd be grateful to know if a lens I'm considering had a high Dk or not.
You're right, but was it really necessary to list all of those materials? It reminds me of a time I "padded" a report in school by quoting a long passage in its entirety. When I got it back from the teacher he had written "was it necessary to quote the whole thing?" in red on my paper. I think I was busted.
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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2012, 04:43 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Freshman
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1
Default

[QUOTE=hudda;179532]FDA gives each contact lens a generic name. In general, all silicon hydrogel lens generic names end in the suffix "filcon" and all non-hydrogel lenses end in "focon"


??all silicon hydrogel lens generic names end in the suffix "filcon"


"filcon" for Hydrogels (Not for Silicon-hydrogels)
"focon" for Non-Hydrogels
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 03-05-2012, 04:30 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Senior
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 367
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn3 View Post
You're right, but was it really necessary to list all of those materials? It reminds me of a time I "padded" a report in school by quoting a long passage in its entirety. When I got it back from the teacher he had written "was it necessary to quote the whole thing?" in red on my paper. I think I was busted.
Some posters in this forum are very "demanding" if not rude. In another thread I provided a link to a pdf document. A poster wanted a detailed summary. Claimed his computer didn't have a pdf reader. Give a brief summary and people demand complete details. You have it reversed. You're upset a poster offered too much details. Listing the materials allows a reader to see which category his present lens is in, what other lenses are in that category and examples of lenses in other categories, if he's looking for a different kind of lens. VERY USEFUL INFORMATION.

I think it's very helpful. You don't. You didn't have to read his entire post. Your post reads rude to me, although I'm sure you didn't intend it that way.

I think some of the posters who attach pictures are padding their posts and wasting bandwidth. I've never made this comment in a single post. I ignore it and keep my mouth shut.
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 03-05-2012, 05:26 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 501
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lurker2010 View Post
Some posters in this forum are very "demanding" if not rude. In another thread I provided a link to a pdf document. A poster wanted a detailed summary. Claimed his computer didn't have a pdf reader. Give a brief summary and people demand complete details. You have it reversed. You're upset a poster offered too much details. Listing the materials allows a reader to see which category his present lens is in, what other lenses are in that category and examples of lenses in other categories, if he's looking for a different kind of lens. VERY USEFUL INFORMATION.

I think it's very helpful. You don't. You didn't have to read his entire post. Your post reads rude to me, although I'm sure you didn't intend it that way.

I think some of the posters who attach pictures are padding their posts and wasting bandwidth. I've never made this comment in a single post. I ignore it and keep my mouth shut.
There are all sorts of people on this forum, and I think that's great. Some people like long, detailed answers, and some prefer shorter ones. Once in a while someone is going to say they didn't like your answer. When it happens to me I take an honest look at their suggestions, and see if I agree, and I go from there. Sometimes I take their suggestions and sometimes I ignore them. When I saw hudda's post at the top of this thread I saw how long it was and just skimmed past it. That's just me.
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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 03-06-2012, 12:30 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 718
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lurker2010 View Post
Some posters in this forum are very "demanding" if not rude.
I hear ya, lurker. When I first read John316's post above ("Do you know what the letters "TMI" stand for, hudda?"), I thought it sounded super snarky. But then, when I thought about it a little more, I realized I didn't have the benefit of hearing his voice tone or inflection, and it might have been innocently said tongue-in-cheek in an attempt to be humorous. We lose those context clues over the internet, and because of that, I try to remember to give people the benefit of the doubt. I hope they will do likewise for me, as I'm sure I too have my moments of coming across differently than I had intended.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lurker2010 View Post
I think some of the posters who attach pictures are padding their posts and wasting bandwidth. I've never made this comment in a single post. I ignore it and keep my mouth shut.
That's probably a good policy to follow. Kind of like when your friend shows up wearing a neon green halter top that's 2 sizes too small.
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