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Where have all the flat base curves gone?

This is a discussion on Where have all the flat base curves gone? within the ECP Corner forums; Am I alone wondering why there is so little available for flat corneas?...


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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-19-2011, 06:16 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Freshman
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: San Leandro, California
Posts: 4
Default Where have all the flat base curves gone?

Am I alone wondering why there is so little available for flat corneas?
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2011, 10:35 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
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Location: United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gepsteinod View Post
Am I alone wondering why there is so little available for flat corneas?
Possibly. I've never even thought of it. So you can theoretically get a contact lens with a 0 base curve?
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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2011, 02:16 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: San Leandro, California
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Default Lack of Options for Flat Soft Contact Lens Base Curve

I didn't say they are NO options, but there are fewer and fewer options, especially in the new contact lens styles and materials. My sales reps say that there is not enough demand... really?
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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2011, 02:20 PM
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Posts: 242
Default A Straight Base Curve

Quote:
Originally Posted by gepsteinod View Post
Am I alone wondering why there is so little available for flat corneas?
Are you looking for contact lenses have have a 0 base curve, like Wendy94 asked?
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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2011, 03:40 PM
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8.9, 9.0 base curves would be useful in high perm lens materials. I get lots of patients with K's less than 41.00 D. Probably in the neighborhood of 10% of my total. I fit about 200 new patients per month.
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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2011, 04:06 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gepsteinod View Post
8.9, 9.0 base curves would be useful in high perm lens materials. I get lots of patients with K's less than 41.00 D. Probably in the neighborhood of 10% of my total. I fit about 200 new patients per month.
Oh, so there's a doctor in the house, huh? Great, it's nice to have you here. I belive you can be the someone who can answer with some authority, rather than be saying "I think I heard that somewhere."
Now, what do yo mean by "K's less than 41.00 D?" People can have a K of Ds?
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Old 03-22-2011, 07:57 PM
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A "K" is shorthand for a Keratometry measurement, an instrument that measures the cornial curvature. The measurement unit is a Diopter (D). Typical K's are 43.00 to 46.00. The Diopter is the curvature unit that produces the equivalent of 1D focusing power. Base Curves, on the other hand, are in units of millimeters (mm) and are the curvature measurements expressed as "radius of curvature." The radius of curvature is the radius of a circle that has the same curvature as the contact lens. What else do you want to know?
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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-23-2011, 09:27 AM
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Posts: 292
Default Since You Asked . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by gepsteinod View Post
What else do you want to know?
Who's on first?

http://www.lens101.com/gas-permeable-contact-lenses/126470-cleanest-rgps.html Post #12
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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 08-18-2011, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gepsteinod View Post
A "K" is shorthand for a Keratometry measurement, an instrument that measures the cornial curvature. The measurement unit is a Diopter (D). Typical K's are 43.00 to 46.00. The Diopter is the curvature unit that produces the equivalent of 1D focusing power. Base Curves, on the other hand, are in units of millimeters (mm) and are the curvature measurements expressed as "radius of curvature." The radius of curvature is the radius of a circle that has the same curvature as the contact lens. What else do you want to know?
I think that just about covers it, gepsteinod.
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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 11-22-2011, 04:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gepsteinod View Post
A "K" is shorthand for a Keratometry measurement, an instrument that measures the corneal curvature. The measurement unit is a Diopter (D). Typical K's are 43.00 to 46.00. The Diopter is the curvature unit that produces the equivalent of 1D focusing power. Base Curves, on the other hand, are in units of millimeters (mm) and are the curvature measurements expressed as "radius of curvature." The radius of curvature is the radius of a circle that has the same curvature as the contact lens. What else do you want to know?
Thank you for explaining all that gepsteinod. I bet that range of normal k readings will come in handy.
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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 12-02-2011, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gepsteinod View Post
A "K" is shorthand for a Keratometry measurement, an instrument that measures the cornial curvature. The measurement unit is a Diopter (D). Typical K's are 43.00 to 46.00. The Diopter is the curvature unit that produces the equivalent of 1D focusing power. Base Curves, on the other hand, are in units of millimeters (mm) and are the curvature measurements expressed as "radius of curvature." The radius of curvature is the radius of a circle that has the same curvature as the contact lens. What else do you want to know?
That's a great answer, gepsteinod. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 04-22-2012, 05:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gepsteinod View Post
Am I alone wondering why there is so little available for flat corneas?
Is there a website that lists all lenses with a BC of 9?
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megabyte1 View Post
Is there a website that lists all lenses with a BC of 9?
oddly enough they were in vial lenses and alot of these lenses are now discontinue.

8.8 would work also.
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Old 04-23-2012, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luvbostonxo2's View Post
oddly enough they were in vial lenses and alot of these lenses are now discontinue.

8.8 would work also.

Okay, so is there a website that lists lenses by base curve so I can find 8.8's?
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Old 04-24-2012, 12:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megabyte1 View Post
Okay, so is there a website that lists lenses by base curve so I can find 8.8's?
8.6 base curve is median
<8.6 steeper base curve
> 8.6 flatter base curve



Sorry there isn't a web site to my knowledge with particular steeper base curves unless your interested in Rgp lenses which can be custom ordered. 8.7-9.0 base curve would work but again lenses can fit differently across all manufacturers. I probably would suggest checking in with your ecp to see if their are other options. Alden optical does have lenses in your flatter base curve but to my knowledge Alden optical soft contact lenses cannot be ordered online and can be purchased through eye docs.

NB DIFFERENT COMPANIES offer different base curves but its different with all companies.

Ex Acuvue lenses with bc of 9.0 fit like 8.8 bc..
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 04-24-2012, 12:34 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Ph.D.
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,369
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by megabyte1 View Post
Okay, so is there a website that lists lenses by base curve so I can find 8.8's?
8.6 base curve is median
<8.6 steeper base curve
> 8.6 flatter base curve



Sorry there isn't a web site to my knowledge with particular steeper base curves unless your interested in Rgp lenses which can be custom ordered. 8.7-9.0 base curve would work but again lenses can fit differently across all manufacturers. I probably would suggest checking in with your ecp to see if their are other options. Alden optical does have lenses in your flatter base curve but to my knowledge Alden optical soft contact lenses cannot be ordered online and can be purchased through eye docs.

NB DIFFERENT COMPANIES offer different base curves but its different with all companies.

Ex acuvue lenses with bc of 9.0 fit like 8.8 bc..
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 04-24-2012, 09:33 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 513
Default Contact Lenses Sorted by Base Curve

Quote:
Originally Posted by megabyte1 View Post
Okay, so is there a website that lists lenses by base curve so I can find 8.8's?
Try this site here. I only scanned it for a few seconds but it looks like they only list contacts up to an 8.7 base curve. Maybe the site can still help you though.

http://www.cl66.org/search/base_curve.htm
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 04-27-2012, 06:19 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2010
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Default

You can look for Coopervision Hydrosoft lenses.
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 04-28-2012, 03:13 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Ph.D.
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,369
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Contact Lens Fitter View Post
You can look for Coopervision Hydrosoft lenses.
agreed...coopervision hydrasoft lenses do come in flatter base curves and is an excellent lens for deposit resistance.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 05-02-2012, 03:00 AM
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Join Date: May 2011
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 46
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Silicone Hydrogel lenses can be fit really tight, base curves of 8.0 you can easily fit with a 8.60 SiHy lens..

In soft lenses its almost like 1 size fits all, but i do agree that there are fewer and fewer high base curve lenses.. I kinda miss them too :-)
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