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Eye Surgery A discussion of the realities of eye surgery such as laser eye surgery options including LASEK, Epi-LASIK, PRK; also LTK, CK and ...


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Laser Iridotomy

This is a discussion on Laser Iridotomy within the Eye Surgery forums; What is Laser Iridotomy? I've never heard of it before I stumbled across it on ...


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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-24-2008, 08:39 AM
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Default Laser Iridotomy

What is Laser Iridotomy? I've never heard of it before I stumbled across it on an ophthalmology web site.
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Old 08-29-2009, 03:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FitnessMistress View Post
What is Laser Iridotomy? I've never heard of it before I stumbled across it on an ophthalmology web site.
Iridotomy is a surgical operation performed on the eye’s iris, the colored ring in the eye with the pupil at its center. Iridotomy uses sophisticated laser technology to perform the surgery. It is used when a person sufferers from angle-closure glaucoma.

The iris may also be pushed forward due to increased pressure on the eye, blocking the eye’s drainage system completely and leading to an angle-closure glaucoma attack. If fluid is completely blocked from draining from the eye, then laser iridotomy is necessary. Iridotomy creates new channels for fluid to flow from behind the iris to the outflow drain of the eye.

When a person suffers an angle-closure glaucoma attack, there may be no obvious symptoms. This is because the attack may develop slowly. Not all people with angle-closure glaucoma experience an attack, but a doctor can recognize the risk before a patient experiences any of the symptoms.
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Old 09-08-2009, 01:37 PM
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Default Iridotomy

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Originally Posted by shely View Post
Iridotomy is a surgical operation performed on the eye’s iris, the colored ring in the eye with the pupil at its center. Iridotomy uses sophisticated laser technology to perform the surgery. It is used when a person sufferers from angle-closure glaucoma.

The iris may also be pushed forward due to increased pressure on the eye, blocking the eye’s drainage system completely and leading to an angle-closure glaucoma attack. If fluid is completely blocked from draining from the eye, then laser iridotomy is necessary. Iridotomy creates new channels for fluid to flow from behind the iris to the outflow drain of the eye.

When a person suffers an angle-closure glaucoma attack, there may be no obvious symptoms. This is because the attack may develop slowly. Not all people with angle-closure glaucoma experience an attack, but a doctor can recognize the risk before a patient experiences any of the symptoms.
Thank you, shely. That's just what I was looking for. Have you answered some of the other questions here in Lens 101?
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Old 10-23-2009, 10:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shely View Post
Iridotomy is a surgical operation performed on the eye’s iris, the colored ring in the eye with the pupil at its center. Iridotomy uses sophisticated laser technology to perform the surgery. It is used when a person sufferers from angle-closure glaucoma.

The iris may also be pushed forward due to increased pressure on the eye, blocking the eye’s drainage system completely and leading to an angle-closure glaucoma attack. If fluid is completely blocked from draining from the eye, then laser iridotomy is necessary. Iridotomy creates new channels for fluid to flow from behind the iris to the outflow drain of the eye.

When a person suffers an angle-closure glaucoma attack, there may be no obvious symptoms. This is because the attack may develop slowly. Not all people with angle-closure glaucoma experience an attack, but a doctor can recognize the risk before a patient experiences any of the symptoms.
Hi Shely,

Can you tell us more about angle-closure glaucoma? You say that there may not be obvious symptoms, but could you tell us some of the warning signs anyway? Can this condition cause a person to lose their sight?
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Old 06-14-2010, 01:52 AM
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The best time to prevent the damage that angle closure glaucoma can cause is to treat it with a laser iridotomy before the actual disease sets in. This is preventative medicine at its best.

Although not everyone with narrow angles actually develops glaucoma, careful evaluation of the angle structure can identify who is at greatest risk. The angle structure is determined by an examination called gonioscopy which is performed with a special contact lens called a gonioprism.

It sounds as if your doctor is trying to save you from the risk of acute angle closure glaucoma. A more detailed discussion of this condition and laser iridotomy can be found in the Glaucoma Research Foundation’s excellent booklet, Understanding and Living With Glaucoma.
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Old 06-14-2010, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by hema1999 View Post
The best time to prevent the damage that angle closure glaucoma can cause is to treat it with a laser iridotomy before the actual disease sets in. This is preventative medicine at its best.

Although not everyone with narrow angles actually develops glaucoma, careful evaluation of the angle structure can identify who is at greatest risk. The angle structure is determined by an examination called gonioscopy which is performed with a special contact lens called a gonioprism.

It sounds as if your doctor is trying to save you from the risk of acute angle closure glaucoma. A more detailed discussion of this condition and laser iridotomy can be found in the Glaucoma Research Foundation’s excellent booklet, Understanding and Living With Glaucoma.
What are "narrow angles"? Are "angles" these "channels" that shely mentioned which allow "fluid to flow from behind the iris to the outflow drain of the eye"?

Last edited by Havoc; 09-07-2010 at 04:30 PM..
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Old 07-20-2010, 01:27 PM
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Default Angles are Channels

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Originally Posted by Havoc View Post
What are "narrow angles"? Are "angles" these "channels" that shely mentioned which allow "fluid to flow from behind the iris to the outflow drain of the eye"?
I found this article at http://www.visionrx.com:

"Acute narrow angle glaucoma occurs primarily in patients who have a shallow space between the cornea at the front of the eye and the colored iris that lies just behind the cornea. As the eye ages, the natural lens behind the pupil grows and the pupil becomes smaller, restricting the flow of fluid to the drainage site. Fluid can build up behind the iris, pushing it forward and blocking the channel (angle) that normally allows aqueous fluid to drain. If blockage happens, a rapid rise in intraocular pressure can occur."

So yes, for some reason these fluid channels are called "angles."
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Old 08-11-2010, 11:02 AM
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Default Angle, Channel, It's All Good

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Originally Posted by SteveKemp View Post
I found this article at http://www.visionrx.com:

"Acute narrow angle glaucoma occurs primarily in patients who have a shallow space between the cornea at the front of the eye and the colored iris that lies just behind the cornea. As the eye ages, the natural lens behind the pupil grows and the pupil becomes smaller, restricting the flow of fluid to the drainage site. Fluid can build up behind the iris, pushing it forward and blocking the channel (angle) that normally allows aqueous fluid to drain. If blockage happens, a rapid rise in intraocular pressure can occur."

So yes, for some reason these fluid channels are called "angles."
So you might also call this "narrow channel glaucoma," right?
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Old 09-07-2010, 04:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveKemp View Post
I found this article at http://www.visionrx.com:

"Acute narrow angle glaucoma occurs primarily in patients who have a shallow space between the cornea at the front of the eye and the colored iris that lies just behind the cornea. As the eye ages, the natural lens behind the pupil grows and the pupil becomes smaller, restricting the flow of fluid to the drainage site. Fluid can build up behind the iris, pushing it forward and blocking the channel (angle) that normally allows aqueous fluid to drain. If blockage happens, a rapid rise in intraocular pressure can occur."

So yes, for some reason these fluid channels are called "angles."
Thanks for the definition, SteveKemp.
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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 10-29-2010, 11:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Havoc View Post
Thanks for the definition, SteveKemp.
I'm glad I can help. It's nice to answer questions sometimes, instead of just asking them.
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:54 PM
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I am scheduled to have this PI done on both eyes next month, as part of the pre-work before my Visian ICL.

The PI is "peripheral iridotomy" and will be 2 little holes in each iris. One week later I will have one lens implant, then one week after that the second lens implant.

For some reason, I am more nervous about the YAG-PI than I am the actual implant. The PI was described to be as "uncomfortable" while the implant was described as a pain-free procedure.
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Old 12-10-2012, 11:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chocolatemint View Post
I am scheduled to have this PI done on both eyes next month, as part of the pre-work before my Visian ICL.

The PI is "peripheral iridotomy" and will be 2 little holes in each iris. One week later I will have one lens implant, then one week after that the second lens implant.

For some reason, I am more nervous about the YAG-PI than I am the actual implant. The PI was described to be as "uncomfortable" while the implant was described as a pain-free procedure.
I guess how painful "uncomfortable" is depends on your pain tolerance. I'm sure they'll make it as comfortable as possible since you will need to stay very still for the procedure.
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Old 12-10-2012, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enah View Post
I guess how painful "uncomfortable" is depends on your pain tolerance. I'm sure they'll make it as comfortable as possible since you will need to stay very still for the procedure.
I'm hoping it's not too bad at all.
Have you had this done?
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