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Honey Eye Drops

This is a discussion on Honey Eye Drops within the General Contact Lens Care and Questions forums; I read on some web site that to preserve your eyesight you can put a ...


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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 05-21-2008, 03:41 PM
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Default Honey Eye Drops

I read on some web site that to preserve your eyesight you can put a drop of honey in each eye.

That's a terrible idea, isn't it?
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 05-21-2008, 06:30 PM
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I never heard of this idea but even if I did I doubt if I would ever put honey in my eyes. Before I'd put anything in them I would talk to my eye doctor. I can't even think of how honey can preserve your eyesight. I don't know, it might be true but I wouldn't chance it. You can't believe everything you read on the Internet.
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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 05-22-2008, 08:06 AM
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I don't know about that. I mean 'm not going to put just any old thing in my eyes especially something that has toxins in it.
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Old 05-22-2008, 04:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacback View Post
I don't know about that. I mean 'm not going to put just any old thing in my eyes especially something that has toxins in it.
Honey has toxins in it???
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Old 05-22-2008, 05:11 PM
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Honey is not pure usually. I wouldn't put anything in my eyes that isn't pretty sterile.
My eyesight is too precious to mess with.
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Old 05-25-2008, 12:39 PM
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Honey is something I would never put in my eyes. I would ask a eye doctor before I ever attempted anything like that.
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Old 05-25-2008, 01:02 PM
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Default its there but not for health

hoiney is an atibiotic anti bacteriosta. thast why you can use it if you have a sore throat. teh antibiotic and antibacterial alction kill off active organisms.
According to teh opthamological association you can use honey when diulted with a fe wother natural ingredients to battle pink eye, conjunctivitis.
medihoney is sterile opothamological grade honey. You mix it with a boric acid solution and apply as compress or as drops.
The use of teh hoiney now as a dilutent antibacteriostat kill off organisms. Do not place a drop of raw honey in teh eye. Egyptian medical papers show the forulation of honey eye drops for sand irritationa nd infections form that.....

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1 &q=ophthalmological+use+honey+eye+drops&spell=1

julie
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Old 05-26-2008, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckifera View Post
I read on some web site that to preserve your eyesight you can put a drop of honey in each eye.

That's a terrible idea, isn't it?
This sounds like a terrible idea. Some people will hype any "natural remedy", making it sound like it can cure just about anything that ails you.

I would definitely not put honey in my eyes!
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Old 05-29-2008, 10:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmys devoted View Post
medihoney is sterile opothamological grade honey. You mix it with a boric acid solution and apply as compress or as drops.
Wait a second. "Medihoney"?? "Opthalmological grade honey??" Boric acid???

Those of you who are reading this, PLEASE consult your eye doctor before mixing up a potion of honey and boric acid.
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Old 05-29-2008, 02:20 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmys devoted View Post
hoiney is an atibiotic anti bacteriosta. thast why you can use it if you have a sore throat. teh antibiotic and antibacterial alction kill off active organisms.
According to teh opthamological association you can use honey when diulted with a fe wother natural ingredients to battle pink eye, conjunctivitis.
medihoney is sterile opothamological grade honey. You mix it with a boric acid solution and apply as compress or as drops.
The use of teh hoiney now as a dilutent antibacteriostat kill off organisms. Do not place a drop of raw honey in teh eye. Egyptian medical papers show the forulation of honey eye drops for sand irritationa nd infections form that.....

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1 &q=ophthalmological+use+honey+eye+drops&spell=1

julie
This sounds much different than just taking honey and dropping it into your eyeball!

I learn something new everyday!
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Old 06-07-2008, 03:14 AM
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I would never consider putting honey into my eyes as they are normally mixed with sugar. With its sticky mixture structure, it might spoilt your eyes.
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Old 06-07-2008, 06:03 PM
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Default

I found a lot of websites about sterile ophthamological grade honey but could not find one that was US based or one that showed it was approved by the FDA. I would need my ophthalmologist who I trust a lot, to recommend something like this and I would want to know had the FDA stamp of approval also.
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Old 06-09-2008, 12:12 PM
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I think I just read my random thing for the day. Im not about to stick anything in my eyes besides my contacts or what comes from my doc. I only get one set of eyes.
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Old 06-09-2008, 09:36 PM
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Smile

For those of you who are considering using honey for your eyes, Manuka honey is a pure honey mainly used for wound and fungal infection.It differs from your table honey in a sense that it doesn't contain add in sugar.
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Old 10-28-2008, 06:56 PM
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Seriously, I want to put honey in my mouth rather than my eyes.
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Old 10-29-2008, 03:56 PM
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Default Honey Eye Drops

Quote:
Originally Posted by tvu732 View Post
Seriously, I want to put honey in my mouth rather than my eyes.
Amen to that!
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 01-05-2009, 04:34 PM
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Default

Yeah I would rather eat it myself. I have heard about that though, I don't think that works.
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Old 01-05-2009, 06:24 PM
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I have bad experience getting viscous sticky fluid in my eyes, I think I'll pass on that one.
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 05-20-2009, 02:27 PM
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Default Honey Eye Drops

Quote:
Originally Posted by flowerhorn View Post
I would never consider putting honey into my eyes as they are normally mixed with sugar. With its sticky mixture structure, it might spoilt your eyes.
According to wikipedia, honey is 82.12% sugar and 17.10% water as it comes from the beehive. That's 99.22% of honey's content. I don't think mixing in any added sugar is necessary.

Or did you say your eyes are normally mixed with sugar?


Still . . . putting honey in your eyes will probably not end well.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 05-20-2009, 02:31 PM
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Default Honey??

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmys devoted View Post
According to the opthamological association you can use honey when diluted with a few other natural ingredients to battle pink eye, conjunctivitis. julie
What ophthalmological association might that be?
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 10-23-2009, 02:55 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckifera View Post
What ophthalmological association might that be?
Julie?

You there?

Oh boy . . .
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 12-18-2009, 01:32 PM
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Default Honey

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckifera View Post
Julie?

You there?

Oh boy . . .
Looks like we lost Julie/Jimmy's Devoted.

I think this thread is quite interesting, but I still haven't seen any real evidence that you can safely put honey in your eyes, let alone any evidence of honey's medicinal qualities.
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Old 12-22-2009, 05:03 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by StairMaster71 View Post
Looks like we lost Julie/Jimmy's Devoted.

I think this thread is quite interesting, but I still haven't seen any real evidence that you can safely put honey in your eyes, let alone any evidence of honey's medicinal qualities.
Yeah, I don't think honey in the eyes is a good idea. It's just so sticky.

I think I'll go along with Winnie and put the honey in my tummy.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2009, 05:13 PM
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Default Honey As It Was Never Intended

Well, there's nothing yet on this thread that convinces me that honey in the eye is a good thing. It's still open, so if you know of any reason why honey is helpful when applied directly to the eyes and you can prove it, please step up.
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 01-25-2010, 04:52 PM
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Default Sterile Doesn't Always Mean Non-Toxic

Quote:
Originally Posted by faithib View Post
Honey is not pure usually. I wouldn't put anything in my eyes that isn't pretty sterile.
My eyesight is too precious to mess with.
Sterility and toxicity aren't necessarily related. You can have something that's germ-free but it could still have toxic impurities.

I still want to know about these "toxins" that scabac mentioned . . . almost two years ago.
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 02-01-2010, 11:21 AM
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Default Honey Eye Drops

Some people don't like to put eye drops in their eyes. How are you going to convince them to put honey in them?
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Old 03-08-2010, 05:08 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Type40 View Post
Sterility and toxicity aren't necessarily related. You can have something that's germ-free but it could still have toxic impurities.

I still want to know about these "toxins" that scabac mentioned . . . almost two years ago.
I still don't know about "toxins" in honey, but I just read about spores in honey that can cause something called "infant botulism." That's why honey should not be given to anyone under the age of one year old. Children and adults have "beneficial bacteria" that can take care of any spores, but babies do not have these bacteria yet.

Under no circumstances should you put honey in someone's eyes. Eyedrops? Yes. contact lenses, sure, but no honey.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2010, 03:50 PM
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Default Honey In the Eye

Quote:
Originally Posted by Type40 View Post
I still don't know about "toxins" in honey, but I just read about spores in honey that can cause something called "infant botulism." That's why honey should not be given to anyone under the age of one year old. Children and adults have "beneficial bacteria" that can take care of any spores, but babies do not have these bacteria yet.

Under no circumstances should you put honey in someone's eyes. Eyedrops? Yes. Contact lenses, sure, but no honey.
Okay. Are we done now? The only thing I can think of is that a drop of honey in they eye may give you a sexy wink--that's permanent.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 04-05-2010, 04:52 PM
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Default Permanent Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by StairMaster71 View Post
Okay. Are we done now? The only thing I can think of is that a drop of honey in they eye may give you a sexy wink--that's permanent.
The old "permanent wink," huh? Nobody wants that. As cute as that young lady looks, I don't think she would look as cute with here eye closed all the time.
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Old 02-21-2012, 12:39 PM
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Default TheWind777

When people voice opinions which have no validity in any facts, those aren't something one should listen to.

"I don't think one should put honey in your eyes," is not something that tells anybody anything.

First, lets talk some facts about honey for a second.

The only food you can open the cover of, sit it on the table for months, and nothing grows in it is honey, period. You will NEVER see fungus growing in honey, nor bacteria cultures. NEVER.

If you take something like garlic... which all sources say is anti-fungal, anti-yeast, anti-bacterial, and you put garlic in a plastic bag in the fridge for a month. You will have green fuzzy garlic.

Take honey and place it in a plastic ziplock bag for three years; I dare you. I guarantee that NOTHING will have grown on that honey.

So, honey is not just some thick liquid that has sugar in it. During ancient times the Romans knew the power of honey. Back in the year 300 there were bronze medical instruments which they would heat to a white-hot condition to close-off blood vessels (cautery). They would amputate an arm or leg with saws, cauterize the blood vessels. Then they'd smear on honey to keep out infection.

So, honey is the most remarkable substance at healing things.

Many believe that the bee propolis in honey is what is responsible. Bee propolis, or bee glue, is what honeybees use to patch their hive. If a mouse finds its way into the hive and is stung to death. The bees have no way to get that mouse, which is soon to be a rotting stinking carcass, out of their hive. They coat it with bee propolis and it is then mummified forever. It won't stink, won't rot, and will dry and wither without being attacked by bacteria and such.

Some have thrown out the word 'toxins' in honey? What are you talking about? What toxins? Honey is manufactured by the bees using pollen from flowers, sap from trees. Chemicals that are manufactured by chemical companies (pharmaceutical companies are usually places like Monsanto, cleverly-disguised) are using true toxic chemicals that you are then putting in your eyes or wherever else. But YOU TRUST THEM and not natural things you eat? What kind of strange judgement you have.

Anyways, I use honey on any abrasion or cut I have ever had. You put Manuka on the cut, put on a bandade, and that's the last you'll ever have to worry about having an infection. There will be not even a trace of redness. There will be no sting. It will heal EXTREMELY FAST.

Neosporin? Toxins? Neosporin is pure chemical waste. There's nothing natural about it at all. And, it in no way works as good as honey does.

As far as eyes goes...

I had a stye, and both before and after I would experience dry eye. The blood vessels in my eye were 'very pronounced'.

So, I melted about 1/2 teaspoon of Manuka honey in 1/4 inch of distilled water in a saucepan. I didn't let the mixture come to the boiling point, because I'm not sure that living enzymes in the honey might not be the working mechanism. Therefore I just stirred it in warm water until it dissolved.

Afterwards I cleaned out an old eyedropper bottle with isopropyl alcohol and dried it all thoroughly. Did the same to the inside of the eye dropper and inside the rubber bulb.

Filled-up the bottle with some of the liquid and as soon as it was cool, I put copious amounts in both eyes. For just a second it stings, but then it stops stinging after about 3 seconds. This is probably because the wax in the honey is melting.

After two or three days you'll start to see noticible results. I've been putting in drops for more than a week, about twice-to-three-times a day. Whenever they feel scratchy, I do it.

...

So, I would say the wax that's in suspension in the honey is probabaly lubricating the surface well. The honey kills any beasties in there such as amoeba, bacteria, yeast such as Candida Albicans which is what causes that matted sticky yellow mess, and over time your eyes become truly sterile again.

So, you can be afraid of putting a natural thing in your eye, then turn right around and put 17 chemicals in your eye (look at the label... Polyethylene Glycol probably ISN'T a thing you should be dropping into your eye) or you can put natural honey that you'd eat on any day into your eye. Your choice.

Visine Tears: Glycerine, Hypromellose, Polyethylene Glycol

Visine-A: Naphazoline Hydrochloride, Pheniramine Maleate

Visine Totality: Glycerine, Hypromellose, Polyethylene Glycol, Tetrahydrozoline, Zinc Sulfate

Visine L R - Oxymetazoline

Now, you tell ME which has more toxins in it.

Other things which help with red eye are... place a green tea teabag into boiling water, wait until it has cooled down, place the warm teabag on your eye. Or, try Chamomile tea, that's also been used forever. They believe it is the tannin in the tea that helps.

These two remedies have been used for hundreds of years. People have been dripping honey in their eyes back since the times of cavemen.

They HAVEN'T been dripping propolene glycol in their eyes since the time of the cavemen.
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Old 02-21-2012, 12:58 PM
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Default TheWind777

Just a thought about toxins and chemical companies.

Visine is made by Johnson & Johnson.

As opoosed to other companies, Johnson and Johnson seems to actually have a heart. Their products, on-the-whole, seem to be environmentally safe... and they make many products which I use every day and trust.

I've used their 'Johnson's First-Aid Cream' since I was a little boy, and I've trusted them.

They also make such things as Band-Aid, Tylenol, Clean & Clear facial wash, Neutrogena Skin and Beauty Care and Acuvue contact lenses... all of which seem to be as environmentally-friendly and pure as any product is.

So, congratulations, Johnson & Johnson, for not becoming a Monsanto to the world.

I should have used a more evil company than Johnson & Johnson when I was making examples of toxic products.

There aren't many companies as truly helpful as Johnson & Johnson is, for which I apologize that I used you as an example.

But, you know what I mean.

There IS some talk out there about there being two toxic substances in their Baby Shampoo. dioxane and a substance called quaternium-15, which releases formaldehyde

But the company says they are only there, "In trace amounts".

Not many companies which can say they do so much good for the world.
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Old 02-21-2012, 01:00 PM
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My main point was... if you want to choose between putting Naphazoline Hydrochloride in your eyes, or honey? I'll chose honey.
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Old 02-21-2012, 01:14 PM
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Default TheWind777

Of course there are many other aspects to honey I didn't mention.

Honey as an Antioxidant for Human Health

"Gram for gram, antioxidants in buckwheat honey equal those of fruits and vegetables," said Dr. May Berenbaum, head of the University of Illinois' entomology department. "It packs the antioxidant power of Vitamin C in a tomato." Researchers at the University of Illinois-Champaign/Urbana have identified the antioxidant values of 14 unifloral honeys.


Cataracts are caused by free-radicals. Antixodiants grab free-radicals and neutralize them.

"Eye and Skin Health

Besides that, antioxidants have an effect on the health of our eyes as well. Eyes are sensitive towards free radicals. Antioxidants protect the eyes by filtering the UV rays which can cause free radical damage, thus preventing eye diseases such as cataracts. A diet that contains vitamins A, C, E and zinc mineral is important to help keep our eyes healthy.

Benefits of antioxidants also include preventing skin moisture loss, which is essential in obtaining healthy skin. Besides consuming antioxidant rich foods, topical application of antioxidants can benefit the skin as well.

This is why honey is one of the best natural skincare solution, since it has great antioxidant properties. The properties of honey also help to cure damaged, problematic skin.

It is simply a wonderful, safe alternative to consider before turning to other drugs or chemical products that may have harmful side effects."

So, if you won't put honey in your eyes, at least eat Manuka honey.
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Old 02-21-2012, 01:27 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWind777 View Post
When people voice opinions which have no validity in any facts, those aren't something one should listen to.

"I don't think one should put honey in your eyes," is not something that tells anybody anything.

First, lets talk some facts about honey for a second.

The only food you can open the cover of, sit it on the table for months, and nothing grows in it is honey, period. You will NEVER see fungus growing in honey, nor bacteria cultures. NEVER.

If you take something like garlic... which all sources say is anti-fungal, anti-yeast, anti-bacterial, and you put garlic in a plastic bag in the fridge for a month. You will have green fuzzy garlic.

Take honey and place it in a plastic ziplock bag for three years; I dare you. I guarantee that NOTHING will have grown on that honey.

So, honey is not just some thick liquid that has sugar in it. During ancient times the Romans knew the power of honey. Back in the year 300 there were bronze medical instruments which they would heat to a white-hot condition to close-off blood vessels (cautery). They would amputate an arm or leg with saws, cauterize the blood vessels. Then they'd smear on honey to keep out infection.

So, honey is the most remarkable substance at healing things.

Many believe that the bee propolis in honey is what is responsible. Bee propolis, or bee glue, is what honeybees use to patch their hive. If a mouse finds its way into the hive and is stung to death. The bees have no way to get that mouse, which is soon to be a rotting stinking carcass, out of their hive. They coat it with bee propolis and it is then mummified forever. It won't stink, won't rot, and will dry and wither without being attacked by bacteria and such.

Some have thrown out the word 'toxins' in honey? What are you talking about? What toxins? Honey is manufactured by the bees using pollen from flowers, sap from trees. Chemicals that are manufactured by chemical companies (pharmaceutical companies are usually places like Monsanto, cleverly-disguised) are using true toxic chemicals that you are then putting in your eyes or wherever else. But YOU TRUST THEM and not natural things you eat? What kind of strange judgement you have.

Anyways, I use honey on any abrasion or cut I have ever had. You put Manuka on the cut, put on a bandade, and that's the last you'll ever have to worry about having an infection. There will be not even a trace of redness. There will be no sting. It will heal EXTREMELY FAST.

Neosporin? Toxins? Neosporin is pure chemical waste. There's nothing natural about it at all. And, it in no way works as good as honey does.

As far as eyes goes...

I had a stye, and both before and after I would experience dry eye. The blood vessels in my eye were 'very pronounced'.

So, I melted about 1/2 teaspoon of Manuka honey in 1/4 inch of distilled water in a saucepan. I didn't let the mixture come to the boiling point, because I'm not sure that living enzymes in the honey might not be the working mechanism. Therefore I just stirred it in warm water until it dissolved.

Afterwards I cleaned out an old eyedropper bottle with isopropyl alcohol and dried it all thoroughly. Did the same to the inside of the eye dropper and inside the rubber bulb.

Filled-up the bottle with some of the liquid and as soon as it was cool, I put copious amounts in both eyes. For just a second it stings, but then it stops stinging after about 3 seconds. This is probably because the wax in the honey is melting.

After two or three days you'll start to see noticible results. I've been putting in drops for more than a week, about twice-to-three-times a day. Whenever they feel scratchy, I do it.

So, I would say the wax that's in suspension in the honey is probabaly lubricating the surface well. The honey kills any beasties in there such as amoeba, bacteria, yeast such as Candida Albicans which is what causes that matted sticky yellow mess, and over time your eyes become truly sterile again.

So, you can be afraid of putting a natural thing in your eye, then turn right around and put 17 chemicals in your eye (look at the label... Polyethylene Glycol probably ISN'T a thing you should be dropping into your eye) or you can put natural honey that you'd eat on any day into your eye. Your choice.

Visine Tears: Glycerine, Hypromellose, Polyethylene Glycol

Visine-A: Naphazoline Hydrochloride, Pheniramine Maleate

Visine Totality: Glycerine, Hypromellose, Polyethylene Glycol, Tetrahydrozoline, Zinc Sulfate

Visine L R - Oxymetazoline

Now, you tell ME which has more toxins in it.

Other things which help with red eye are... place a green tea teabag into boiling water, wait until it has cooled down, place the warm teabag on your eye. Or, try Chamomile tea, that's also been used forever. They believe it is the tannin in the tea that helps.

These two remedies have been used for hundreds of years. People have been dripping honey in their eyes back since the times of cavemen.

They HAVEN'T been dripping propolene glycol in their eyes since the time of the cavemen.
You're not a representative of Manuka honey by any chance are you? You seem remarkably well-informed about honey. There's nothing wrong with that in itself, just as long as you use your powers for good and don't try to sell something to someone who's not interested.

I agree with most of what you say here, I just have a few questions about some specific points.

I wanted to learn more about the practice of disinfecting medical instruments with the sweet, sticky stuff, and here's something I found:

There have been famous episodes of inebriation of humans from consuming toxic honey throughout history. For example, honey produced from nectar of Rhododendron ponticum (also known as Azalea pontica) contains alkaloids that are poisonous to humans but do not harm bees. Xenophon, Aristotle, Strabo, Pliny the Elder, and Columella all document the results of eating this "maddening" honey. Honey from these plants poisoned Roman troops in the first century BC under Pompey the Great when they were attacking the Heptakometes in Turkey. The soldiers were delirious and vomiting after eating the toxic honey. The Romans were easily defeated. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia; "Bees and toxic chemicals."

Did you catch that? "Toxic honey."

Here's what I learned about bee propolis: Bee propolis is a sticky, brown substance sometimes known as bee glue. The honey bees gather tree resin, the main ingredient in propolis, from buds and cracks in the bark. The bees add salivary secretions to the resin by chewing on it, and add beeswax to the mix. Propolis has a little pollen in it, too. When analyzed, propolis contains about 50% resin, 30% wax and oils, 10% salivary secretions, 5% pollen, and 5% amino acids, vitamins, and minerals.

Propolis is known to have antimicrobial properties, and many scientists are studying the potential uses of propolis as a therapy for certain diseases. Propolis is particularly effective at killing the microorganisms that cause gum disease. It has also been shown to be effective at inhibiting the growth of certain cancers.

--http://insects.about.com "What Is Bee Propolis?"

What "true toxic chemicals" are people putting in their eyes? Just because something has a long name doesn't mean it's bad.

Now for some Neopsporin treatment. In reality, the ingredients of Neopsporin are:

"Neomycin Sulfate is in the aminoglycoside family of antibiotics active against gram positive and gram negative bacteria.
Polymyxin B is a cationic polypeptide antibiotic active against gram positive and gram negative bacteria.
Bacitracin Zinc is a cyclic polypeptide antibiotic effective against gram positive bacteria.
Pramoxine is an external analgesic that provides temporary relief of pain or discomfort." -- http://www.neosporinfirstaid.com/firstaid/neosporin.asp?sec=0&page=16

Just because something doesn't have an easy to pronounce name like "honey" doesn't mean it's "chemical waste." "Waste" is defined as "anything unused, unproductive, or not properly utilized. Anything left over or superfluous, as excess material or by-products, not of use for the work in hand . . . " -- Dictionary.com

I'll leave it up to you to explain how the ingredients in Neopsorin are "pure chemical waste" based on that definition.

As for following the wisdom of the cavemen, how do you like your leeches and bloodletting? How about a few trephination holes in the skull?



Ever notice that those wise cavemen all extinct now?

Listen, I don't mean to make fun of you. I just want you to back up some of your rather extravagant claims. Maybe you've got something here that Lens 101 members should know about. Show us the way.
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 02-22-2012, 08:23 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Freshman
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 7
Default After a Week...

The problem with ALL eyedrops, as far as I've ever seen, is the more you use them the more your eye needs them. So, whether you use commercial or natural things - the overall need for drops increases rather than decreases after a week of using any drop.

That always seems the case with anything concerned with the body, though. The body starts thinking you need to use that thing, no matter what it is, so it then stops production of it's own tears - or something like that.

So, in the end, it might relieve the dryness problem while you're doing it; but after a week of whatever drops you use the overall dryness problem is worse when you stop using the drops.

Warm compresses seem to be a good thing to do most of the time. The warmth of the washrag melts the natural oils in your tear ducts and is healthy for your eyes.

In the case of Visine, I never found Visine to help the overall dryness of my eye after a week of use, back when I wore contacts. And, with honey, the overall redness of my eye after a week was the same as before I had tried it (although the stye backed off to a very good level, it's still a bit red along the eyelid).

After a week of diluted honey my eyes are just about the same as they were before I tried the drops.

Did they help with the stye? Definitely. Will I continue using honey drops, of course not. But it was a good experiment.

I was just saying that the whole page was just people saying nothing. There wasn't one person who had actually tried honey saying anything at all. Since I dare anything, I figured I'd try it and I did. Therefore I could say something about it.

Would I recommend someone else to do it? No.

Do I work for Manuka honey place? I don't even remember the name Manuka, most of the time. I say, "You know that honey that begins with M."

After trying all the things they suggest to try for styes and dry eyes, I would say a warm washcloth is the best to use. The same goes for any commercial eyedrops I've ever tried. The overall dryness always seems to increase no matter what eyedrop is used for a period of time. It would be nice if someone actually invented an eyedrop which makes the eye feel better after a week without addicting the body to the need for that eyedrop; but it may be an impossible task. It's just the way the body works.

If you take melatonin to go to sleep, you then need to take melatonin to go to sleep... same problem. No matter what it is, do it constantly and your body then needs you to use it constantly (underarm deodorant comes to mind).

As far as what honey is best at? Wound dressings. I will never use a commercial ointment again. Honey works far better, makes it heal faster, and seals off the wound. It just works better than Neosporin does. Would I recommend other people to try honey for wounds, definitely.

Would I recommend people putting honey in their eyes? Maybe once, but don't do it for long periods of time. However, after doing it a week with watered-down honey there was no problem having done that. The overall redness is about the same, the overall dryness is about the same. But that's always been the case with every eye drop I ever used. It's best not to use eyedrops.
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 02-22-2012, 09:13 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Freshman
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 7
Default Castor Oil

Actually, of the things I tried for dry eyes the thing which was better than everything was castor oil.

You just take a dropper bottle, put the castor oil into it and put one drop in each eye.

Lubricates, inhibits organisms, it's comforting, doesn't burn when you put it in, cheap and has no side effects that I've seen.

Just go to Walgreens and get their USP Castor Oil.

And yes, I would recommend using castor oil in your eyes for long-term use, whereas I wouldn't recommend long-term with honey.

---

Getting back to Visine, Visine never helped me before. It was always about the same as washing my eyes out with water.
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 02-22-2012, 09:23 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Freshman
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 7
Default Greed as Care

It must be remembered that companies are trying to get money. They really care little about anything other than profit. All products have not had a history beyond a few years.

And, yes, sometimes people have tried things that didn't work or made no sense over time such as blood letting; but how many years was blood letting done? ten years?

How long has garlic been used effectively? Or honey?

So, I'll stick with something that works effectively for a thousand years over something that some company who's main concern is money for themselves is going to do in their 'caring' way.

The only care a company has is that it is not sued. I find it particularly abhorrent that companies have gotten to the point where something can have a ton of "side-effects", yet still be on the market.

I don't trust America, or American products, or American companies, or anybody that bases greed as their central platform of competition. That's not care and in the end it only creates chemical products which cause more real problems in the end - for the increase of chemicals in the environment that are not natural nor should they have ever been invented.

It's very funny that people trust chemicals and have more belief in them than in natural things which have been used for thousands of years.
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