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If You Don't Stop You'll Go Blind

This is a discussion on If You Don't Stop You'll Go Blind within the General Eye Health forums; On some of these contact lens /health forums people sternly warn readers "If you don't ...


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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2008, 02:25 PM
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Default If You Don't Stop You'll Go Blind

On some of these contact lens/health forums people sternly warn readers "If you don't change your contacts, you'll go blind." "If you wear the wrong size contacts, you'll go blind." "If you don't clean your contact lenses properly, you could go blind."

I understand that you need to be careful when handling medical devices that touch your eyes, but seriously, what kinds of things can really, truly cause you to literally permanently lose your ability to see?
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2009, 11:42 PM
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It might not make you go blind, but if you don't clean then they can irritate your eyes, and even an infection could happen, alway clean them.
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Old 02-03-2009, 12:31 PM
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there is nothing going to be like this...people are just spreading rumors.
If you don't wear contact of appropriate size, it will cause un easyness in your eyes and you will remove it quickly, so there is no point in getting blind.
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Old 02-14-2009, 05:20 AM
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think of possible things that could start infection, that would eventually narcotizing your eye cells and may lead to blindness.
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Old 04-23-2009, 02:32 PM
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Default If You Don't Stop You'll Go Blind

Thank you for your answers everybody. Sorry I was so slow in saying it.

It sounds like you all agree that contact lens abuse and/or negelct will probably not lead to blindness, except for jhellie_baby. (That's not a Doctor Who reference, is it?) Jhellie says that an infection could result in "narcotizing your eye cells and may lead to blindness."

I don't understand that word "narcotizing," though. What does that mean? It sounds bad.
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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-27-2009, 12:34 PM
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I also agree with you. Read my previous post here: http://www.lens101.com/general-eye-health/56873-wore-one-pair-contacs-24-7-over-year.html

Or just scroll down this forum "general eye health" and look for the topic "Wore one pair of contacs 24/7 for over a year".
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Old 04-27-2009, 02:16 PM
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Default If You Don't Stop You'll Go Blind

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTracTurbo View Post
I also agree with you. Read my previous post here: http://www.lens101.com/general-eye-health/56873-wore-one-pair-contacs-24-7-over-year.html

Or just scroll down this forum "general eye health" and look for the topic "Wore one pair of contacs 24/7 for over a year".
Wow. I read that thread and it sounds like a lot of people were warning you against wearing contact lenses for so long.

I'm afraid I'm going to have to side with them, AllTracTurbo. Wearing one pair of contact lenses day and night for over a year just might make someone go blind, even if you didn't.

In that other thread you admitted that the reason you wore them so long is because you're "too lazy" to get new ones.

You do what you like with your eyes, but it's irresponsible to get on a public web site like this one and tell people it's okay to wear contacts for a year.
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Old 04-27-2009, 03:06 PM
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Default

I've heard from sources that damage can be done if someone tries to remove a lens that has adhered to the eye. Apparently there can be a threat of this if some lenses are left in too long.

I haven't heard the dramatic "you'll go blind" warning.
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Old 04-27-2009, 03:56 PM
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Default

I've never heard anything like that but if I did I wouldn't believe it. I might be concerned for a short time but then I'd realize that it was just a scare tactic. I mean, why would wearing contacts, even for a long time, make you go blind? I can understand irritation or possibly some kind of infection but blindness just doesn't make too much sense to me.
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Old 04-27-2009, 11:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vita_man View Post
Wow. I read that thread and it sounds like a lot of people were warning you against wearing contact lenses for so long.

I'm afraid I'm going to have to side with them, AllTracTurbo. Wearing one pair of contact lenses day and night for over a year just might make someone go blind, even if you didn't.

In that other thread you admitted that the reason you wore them so long is because you're "too lazy" to get new ones.

You do what you like with your eyes, but it's irresponsible to get on a public web site like this one and tell people it's okay to wear contacts for a year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vita_man
In that other thread you admitted that the reason you wore them so long is because you're "too lazy" to get new ones.
Not that i'm too lazy to get new ones, but that i'm too lazy to get a job so I can afford new ones.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Vita_man
You do what you like with your eyes, but it's irresponsible to get on a public web site like this one and tell people it's okay to wear contacts for a year.
Last line in that thread: [Disclaimer]I'm not advising anyone to wear their contacts longer than prescribed. Just sharing my experiance. Wear at your own risk.[/Disclaimer]



Also, I do believe there is a posibility that you could go blind from wearing them improperly. If you get a bad enough infection, i'm sure it could permanently blind you.

When I said that I agree with him in my last post, I was agreeing to "It sounds like you all agree that contact lens abuse and/or negelct will probably not lead to blindness". I believe that it is possible to go blind from it, but I also believe you probably won't.

Not sure if protein deposits have any harmful effects other than discomfort and blurryness when wearing the contacts.

I don't know how dangerous it is if the contact gets stuck to your eye. I know someone this happened to and they were able to remove it and give him drops he had to put in his eyes for a while. When they do PRK (type of lasik), they scrape off the top layer of your eye and then let it heal itself. Would imagine they could do that if it messed up the top layer of your eye.
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Old 08-14-2009, 09:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeRoberts View Post
On some of these contact lens/health forums people sternly warn readers "If you don't change your contacts, you'll go blind." "If you wear the wrong size contacts, you'll go blind." "If you don't clean your contact lenses properly, you could go blind."

I understand that you need to be careful when handling medical devices that touch your eyes, but seriously, what kinds of things can really, truly cause you to literally permanently lose your ability to see?
i think infection in the eyes can make us blind..if not treated early..and it may occur when we do not use properly our contact lenses and the likes..
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Old 08-15-2009, 09:22 AM
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You have to give your eyes a rest sometimes. I couldn't do that even if I really wanted to. I can't sleep with my contacts in because I like to rub my eyes when I wake up. One time I forgot I had my contacts in and rubbed my eyes and that hurt.
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Old 08-16-2009, 10:54 PM
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Default

That sounds pretty extreme, but after reading everyone else's responses, it's got me to thinking that there may be a bit of truth to what I primarily thought was just a myth. I wasn't planning on wearing a contact lens for too long, but now I definitely won't do it.
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Old 08-17-2009, 03:08 AM
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What if you forget to remove your contacts and you've fallen asleep? Are you going to get blind? Well, is their a contacts that wont give you and bad effects?
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Old 09-15-2009, 11:05 AM
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Default Good For You

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsuba View Post
That sounds pretty extreme, but after reading everyone else's responses, it's got me to thinking that there may be a bit of truth to what I primarily thought was just a myth. I wasn't planning on wearing a contact lens for too long, but now I definitely won't do it.
It always makes me feel warm all over when I read a post like yours, mitsuba. Someone who says "I didn't that particular behavior was dangerous. I'm not going to do it now." Lens 101 has possibly prevented some big problems for you, and I'm glad.
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Old 09-15-2009, 11:09 AM
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Default What if You Forget to Remove Your Contacts?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gamblinglord View Post
What if you forget to remove your contacts and you've fallen asleep? Are you going to get blind? Well, is their a contacts that won't give you and bad effects?
If you forget to take your daily disposable contact lenses out for one night, it probably won't hurt you.
To answer your last question, there are contacts that you can leave in for a week or even a month. Just look around www.lens.com for monthly and weekly contacts.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 09-22-2009, 12:53 PM
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Default

Not changing your contacts for a long time won't make it harder to remove the contact as in get stuck, will it? I hope this isn't one of those things like a person being fused to a toilet because they sat on it for years and years. It's not, right?
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 09-22-2009, 03:20 PM
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Default Fused Contacts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsuba View Post
Not changing your contacts for a long time won't make it harder to remove the contact as in get stuck, will it? I hope this isn't one of those things like a person being fused to a toilet because they sat on it for years and years. It's not, right?
Okay, I'm going to ignore that toilet thing and tell you that contact lenses can get stuck to your eyes if you leave them on too long. I'm not exactly sure of the mechanism at work, but it is possible. Please change your contacts on schedule.
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Old 10-09-2009, 11:56 AM
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Default To Your Eye Health

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsuba View Post
That sounds pretty extreme, but after reading everyone else's responses, it's got me to thinking that there may be a bit of truth to what I primarily thought was just a myth. I wasn't planning on wearing a contact lens for too long, but now I definitely won't do it.
I'm with Juniorgergil on this one. I'm glad Lens 101 got you thinking. I wish you many years of good eye health, mitsuba.
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Old 10-09-2009, 12:00 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhellie_baby View Post
that would eventually narcotizing your eye cells and may lead to blindness.
Yeah, jhellie_baby. What do you mean by "narcotizing?" Spell check doesn't flag it as being misspelled.

Hmmm . . . Be right back--

--A ha! I found it. Thefreedictionary.com says:

nar·co·tize (närk-tz)
tr.v. nar·co·tized, nar·co·tiz·ing, nar·co·tiz·es
1. To place under the influence of a narcotic.
2. To put to sleep; lull.
3. To dull; deaden.


Okay, so it is a real word. Who knew?

Spell Check knew.
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2009, 03:35 PM
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Default You'll Go Blind

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeRoberts View Post
Yeah, jhellie_baby. What do you mean by "narcotizing?" Spell check doesn't flag it as being misspelled.

Hmmm . . . Be right back--

--A ha! I found it. Thefreedictionary.com says:

nar·co·tize (närk-tz)
tr.v. nar·co·tized, nar·co·tiz·ing, nar·co·tiz·es
1. To place under the influence of a narcotic.
2. To put to sleep; lull.
3. To dull; deaden.


Okay, so it is a real word. Who knew?

Spell Check knew.
Thanks for the detective work, Lee. I didn't think "narcotizing" was a real word either.

For those of you who are still interested, it doesn't look we have any definite proof that misusing your contacts will literally rob you of your sight. I'm told that even though you still may be able to see, wearing contact lenses too long will be very uncomfortable. So don't do it!
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Old 11-02-2009, 05:50 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Railfan View Post
Thanks for the detective work, Lee. I didn't think "narcotizing" was a real word either.

For those of you who are still interested, it doesn't look we have any definite proof that misusing your contacts will literally rob you of your sight. I'm told that even though you still may be able to see, wearing contact lenses too long will be very uncomfortable. So don't do it!
Yes, Railfan. I agree. Don't wear your contact lenses a lay longer than intended. It's just not worth the risk and for what? Saving some money on new contact lenses? If you're so cheap that saving money is more important to the health of your eyes, you should probably wear glasses.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg jack20benny.jpg (29.4 KB, 132 views)
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Old 11-09-2009, 06:18 PM
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Default Jack Benny's Glasses

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeRoberts View Post
Yes, Railfan. I agree. Don't wear your contact lenses a lay longer than intended. It's just not worth the risk and for what? Saving some money on new contact lenses? If you're so cheap that saving money is more important to the health of your eyes, you should probably wear glasses.
I get it! Jack Benny's cheap and he wears glasses. That's a good one, Railfan.

I found out that this is allegedly Jack Benny's first "cheap" joke: "I took my girl to dinner, and she laughed so hard at one of my jokes that she dropped her tray."

Mmm hmm.
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Old 11-11-2009, 09:47 AM
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Default A Good Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vita_man View Post
I get it! Jack Benny's cheap and he wears glasses. That's a good one, Railfan.

I found out that this is allegedly Jack Benny's first "cheap" joke: "I took my girl to dinner, and she laughed so hard at one of my jokes that she dropped her tray."

Mmm hmm.
So now were telling old Jack Benny jokes?

This has been a good thread, despite all that. It always amazes me that there are so many posts that don't become threads, and then you have threads like this with posts in the double digits.
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Old 11-23-2009, 04:41 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeriBrown View Post
So now were telling old Jack Benny jokes?
It's tough to go wrong with the classic comedians like Jack Benny or Abbott and Costello.

For all of you young people who have never heard of Jack Benny or Abbott and Costello, see if you can find some recordings of their routines on line. Good stuff.
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Old 11-24-2009, 06:35 AM
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The two most serious warnings I have read, or have been told about by Eye Care Professionals with respect to contact lens wear are:

Wearing too long/day resulting in oxygen deprivation to the eye. The eye care professional will see the results of this as capillaries growing into the eye to supply more blood/oxygen to the eye. If it is deemed serious, you will be advised to reduce the wearing time of your contact lenses.

The second and in my view most frightening damage, is an infection caused by using contaminated tap water to reinsert a lens if it has come out (or e.g. you have taken it out at an all night party) and don't have the correct lens solution to reinsert them in the morning. That particular infection can cause permanent blindness within 24 hours if not treated.

In AllTracTurbo's case, he says he has worn contact lenses (Monthly disposable) for 13 months, 24/7. His lenses are Encore Premium/Coopervision Frequency 55 aspheric ones made from Methafilcon A. This has a relatively low Dk oxygen permeability value, so I don't think his optician would recommend wearing them for more than say 12-15 hours/day maximum, let alone 24 hours/day. The very real risk here is of oxygen starvation of the eye and capillary growth, which I think he will not feel happening. It would (if it is occurring) show up in an eye examination.

AllTracTurbo has his own reasons for his contact lens wearing regime and to be fair, he does not recommend others to do the same, but he may be damaging his eyes unknowingly through wearing his lenses too many hours/day. If he wants to wear his lenses 24/7 then at the very least, he should consider changing to Silicone Hydrogel lenses, which generally have much higher oxygen permeability and should reduce the risk of oxygen deprivation to the eye during long periods of contact lens wear. However, he will need a prescription for the new lenses and a visit to the eye care professional (which sounds like it is overdue anyway).

knotlob
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Old 11-24-2009, 10:00 AM
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Default Thank You Knotlob

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
The two most serious warnings I have read, or have been told about by Eye Care Professionals with respect to contact lens wear are:

Wearing too long/day resulting in oxygen deprivation to the eye. The eye care professional will see the results of this as capillaries growing into the eye to supply more blood/oxygen to the eye. If it is deemed serious, you will be advised to reduce the wearing time of your contact lenses.

The second and in my view most frightening damage, is an infection caused by using contaminated tap water to reinsert a lens if it has come out (or e.g. you have taken it out at an all night party) and don't have the correct lens solution to reinsert them in the morning. That particular infection can cause permanent blindness within 24 hours if not treated.

In AllTracTurbo's case, he says he has worn contact lenses (Monthly disposable) for 13 months, 24/7. His lenses are Encore Premium/Coopervision Frequency 55 aspheric ones made from Methafilcon A. This has a relatively low Dk oxygen permeability value, so I don't think his optician would recommend wearing them for more than say 12-15 hours/day maximum, let alone 24 hours/day. The very real risk here is of oxygen starvation of the eye and capillary growth, which I think he will not feel happening. It would (if it is occurring) show up in an eye examination.

AllTracTurbo has his own reasons for his contact lens wearing regime and to be fair, he does not recommend others to do the same, but he may be damaging his eyes unknowingly through wearing his lenses too many hours/day. If he wants to wear his lenses 24/7 then at the very least, he should consider changing to Silicone Hydrogel lenses, which generally have much higher oxygen permeability and should reduce the risk of oxygen deprivation to the eye during long periods of contact lens wear. However, he will need a prescription for the new lenses and a visit to the eye care professional (which sounds like it is overdue anyway).

knotlob
Thank you for your very informative--and hopefully, effective--posting. There are a lot of posts and threads here in Lens 101 that talk about whether or not it's dangerous to wear your contacts too long. It looks like you've read AllTracTurbo's thread about his contact lens wearing marathons. I hope you were able to get through to him/her and any others that may have been inspired by the example.

Tell me more about these blood vessels, also known as "neovascularization." Would you mind explaining why this is a bad thing, even though only an eye doctor can see it happening?
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Old 11-25-2009, 04:53 AM
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Hello once again. I have been browsing the web in search of more information on eye capillaries and oxygen deprivation. Most of the medical information is full of jargon and therefore fairly unintelligible to the layman. However, this is my assessment of the problem:

The cornea of the eye obtains it's oxygen directly from the air around it via the tear film. There are no capillaries in the cornea under normal healthy eye conditions. This is so that light passing through the cornea to the retina is unobstructed and vision is sharp.

At night when the eyes are closed the front (anterior) surface of the cornea can obtain oxygen via the back of the eye lid capillaries.

When contact lenses are worn the oxygen supply to the cornea is reduced by the physical barrier that the contact lens presents. Some of the old poly methylmethacrylate/perspex hard lenses are oxygen impermeable, while the newer silicone hydrogel lenses have much better oxygen permeability/breathability.

The cornea is a living tissue and requires oxygen. If the cornea is deprived of oxygen, by for example, wearing lenses which don't float properly on the eye to allow the tear film to move, or are just not permeable enough for the wearing time, then the cornea must get oxygen from somewhere else. If this is not possible the cornea eye tissue may die. Normally the eye will develop new capillaries in the conjunctiva (white of the eye) and then into the cornea of the eye. These corneal capillaries will impair vision. The wearer will not feel this happening and sometimes it is difficult to recognise a slow deterioration in eyesight.

Lack of corneal oxygen mainly through sleeping in lenses not designed for this wear regime can cause the cornea to swell and become hazy. Lenses must not be worn until the eye recovers with medical help. This condition is of course obvious to the wearer.

Corneal ulcers appear more serious and could lead to scarring of the cornea and if this occurs in the centre of the cornea, vision may be so badly affected than a lens transplant is required. The causes of Red Eye and Corneal Ulcers seem to be a little unclear, but probably linked to deposits on the lens/dirty lenses/contaminated lenses or solutions.

There are some links here - some technical and some rather simplistic:

http://theadventuresoflittlefoot.blogspot.com/2009/03/contact-lens-abuse.html (simplistic) - Contact lens abuser.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070917075045AAxGvTy (simplistic - why are there no capillaries in the cornea?)

http://www.optometry.co.uk/articles/docs/6c039329dfff72a37b69d73f8b32a1d1_gurwoord20021031. pdf (technical, CLARE Contact Lens-Induced Acute Red Eye)

http://www.perret-optic.ch/optometrie/pathologie_oculaire/patho_complication_vc/patho_cont1_gb.htm#disposable (Corneal ulcers and abrasion/infection, etc.)

http://www.lensalert.com/pdf/Obvious_Signs_of_Abuse.pdf (obvious signs of Contact lens abuse)

Interestingly, it seems that those most prone to contact lens abuse are young (late teens to 30's).

knotlob
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Old 11-25-2009, 11:42 AM
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Default If You Wear Your Contacts Too Long . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Hello once again. I have been browsing the web in search of more information on eye capillaries and oxygen deprivation. Most of the medical information is full of jargon and therefore fairly unintelligible to the layman. However, this is my assessment of the problem:

The cornea of the eye obtains it's oxygen directly from the air around it via the tear film. There are no capillaries in the cornea under normal healthy eye conditions. This is so that light passing through the cornea to the retina is unobstructed and vision is sharp.

At night when the eyes are closed the front (anterior) surface of the cornea can obtain oxygen via the back of the eye lid capillaries.

When contact lenses are worn the oxygen supply to the cornea is reduced by the physical barrier that the contact lens presents. Some of the old poly methylmethacrylate/perspex hard lenses are oxygen impermeable, while the newer silicone hydrogel lenses have much better oxygen permeability/breathability.

The cornea is a living tissue and requires oxygen. If the cornea is deprived of oxygen, by for example, wearing lenses which don't float properly on the eye to allow the tear film to move, or are just not permeable enough for the wearing time, then the cornea must get oxygen from somewhere else. If this is not possible the cornea eye tissue may die. Normally the eye will develop new capillaries in the conjunctiva (white of the eye) and then into the cornea of the eye. These corneal capillaries will impair vision. The wearer will not feel this happening and sometimes it is difficult to recognise a slow deterioration in eyesight.

Lack of corneal oxygen mainly through sleeping in lenses not designed for this wear regime can cause the cornea to swell and become hazy. Lenses must not be worn until the eye recovers with medical help. This condition is of course obvious to the wearer.

Corneal ulcers appear more serious and could lead to scarring of the cornea and if this occurs in the centre of the cornea, vision may be so badly affected than a lens transplant is required. The causes of Red Eye and Corneal Ulcers seem to be a little unclear, but probably linked to deposits on the lens/dirty lenses/contaminated lenses or solutions.

There are some links here - some technical and some rather simplistic:

http://theadventuresoflittlefoot.blogspot.com/2009/03/contact-lens-abuse.html (simplistic) - Contact lens abuser.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070917075045AAxGvTy (simplistic - why are there no capillaries in the cornea?)

http://www.optometry.co.uk/articles/docs/6c039329dfff72a37b69d73f8b32a1d1_gurwoord20021031. pdf (technical, CLARE Contact Lens-Induced Acute Red Eye)

http://www.perret-optic.ch/optometrie/pathologie_oculaire/patho_complication_vc/patho_cont1_gb.htm#disposable (Corneal ulcers and abrasion/infection, etc.)

http://www.lensalert.com/pdf/Obvious_Signs_of_Abuse.pdf (obvious signs of Contact lens abuse)

Interestingly, it seems that those most prone to contact lens abuse are young (late teens to 30's).

knotlob
Bravo, knotlob. This is a wonderful post. I found several reasons why wearing contact lenses for too long can be hazardous to your health. I hope lots of people read this and stop over wearing their contact lenses. So many people have such a careless attitude about their eye health. They seen to think that if it's not painful, it's not harmful. Thank you for spelling it out for us.
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Old 11-30-2009, 02:24 PM
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Default I Agree

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klingons4Peace View Post
Bravo, knotlob. This is a wonderful post. I found several reasons why wearing contact lenses for too long can be hazardous to your health. I hope lots of people read this and stop over wearing their contact lenses. So many people have such a careless attitude about their eye health. They seen to think that if it's not painful, it's not harmful. Thank you for spelling it out for us.
Hear, hear, Klingons4Pease. I thought this was a very interesting and informative post as well. Good work, knotlob.
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Old 11-30-2009, 04:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeriBrown View Post
Hear, hear, Klingons4Pease. I thought this was a very interesting and informative post as well. Good work, knotlob.
Thanks Kingons4Peace and PeriBrown for your comments. It's been a bit of an educational exercise for me too, reading the various Internet articles. I like to understand why things are so, that way I remember them better, but I do give the Medics a bad time with awkward questions!! They always want you to sign disclaimers before doing any work on you, so I like to understand what is going on (especially in hospitals, etc).

knotlob
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 11-30-2009, 04:29 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Senior
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 380
Default The Informed Consumer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
I like to understand why things are so, that way I remember them better, but I do give the Medics a bad time with awkward questions!! They always want you to sign disclaimers before doing any work on you, so I like to understand what is going on (especially in hospitals, etc).

knotlob
Well, people shouldn't feel like you're a trouble maker for asking questions and reading the fine print. It's good to be an informed consumer, and I'm glad you're getting useful information from Lens 101.
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Old 12-08-2009, 01:18 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
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Posts: 503
Default If You Wear Your Contacts Too Long . . .

Let me also add my appreciation to knotlob for making it so clear why one should not wear contacts in a manner for which they were not designed. If you sleep in contact lenses that aren't meant to be worn overnight, or wear any kind of contact lens for too long, you're asking for trouble, and now you know why.
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Old 12-08-2009, 05:15 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 645
Default Knowledge is Power

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Thanks Kingons4Peace and PeriBrown for your comments. It's been a bit of an educational exercise for me too, reading the various Internet articles. I like to understand why things are so, that way I remember them better, but I do give the Medics a bad time with awkward questions!! They always want you to sign disclaimers before doing any work on you, so I like to understand what is going on (especially in hospitals, etc).

knotlob
I'm with BusDriver. It's good to ask questions. That's why we're here at Lens 101, right? Either we have a question or we believe that we can help others with their questions.
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Old 12-08-2009, 06:42 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Ph.D.
 
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Originally Posted by LeeRoberts View Post
I'm with BusDriver. It's good to ask questions. That's why we're here at Lens 101, right? Either we have a question or we believe that we can help others with their questions.
It's quite useful seeing the questions that arise on the forum and if I have not previously pestered my optician with that same question (or I basically get a 'I haven't got a clue' type answer) then it may stimulate me to go and look for the answer on the Internet.

However, there is no substitute for learning from other's actual hands (eyes?) on experience with the different types of lenses and keeping up to date with the developments in the types of contact lenses.

knotlob
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Old 12-10-2009, 03:20 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
It's quite useful seeing the questions that arise on the forum and if I have not previously pestered my optician with that same question (or I basically get a 'I haven't got a clue' type answer) then it may stimulate me to go and look for the answer on the Internet.

However, there is no substitute for learning from other's actual hands (eyes?) on experience with the different types of lenses and keeping up to date with the developments in the types of contact lenses.

knotlob
Like Lee Roberts, this is why I like Lens 101. It's one thing to have theories about contact lenses, but it's something else to speak from experience.
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Old 12-11-2009, 10:55 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
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Default Speaking From Experience

Quote:
Originally Posted by LP39A View Post
Like Lee Roberts, this is why I like Lens 101. It's one thing to have theories about contact lenses, but it's something else to speak from experience.
Let's just hope we don't have very many people speaking from painful experience.
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Old 01-18-2010, 01:14 PM
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I just wanted to give an update and say thanks to knotlob for finding this information.

It's been about 10 months since I changed the contacts that I wore for over a year and since then I have been changing each pair about every 4 months.

A few months after posting that thread I did notice small red veins showing up in the whites of my eyes. Over time they did gradually start to get a little bigger and I figured this was b/c my eyes were being starved of oxygen from the contacts and they were compensating by bringing more blood to my eyes.

I tried looking this up online to see if there would be any harmful effects from it and all I found was a lot of other people that had the same issue (most of them wore contacts), but there was no information on it. A lot of them talked with their eye doctors and still no solid information.

Without any good information I just thought maybe they veins or capillaries would get to a certain size where there would be enough blood flow to compensate for the missing oxygen that the contacts are blocking.

I continued to wear the contacts 24 hours a day and I still do, but the veins in the whites of my eyes still are very slowly staring to increase in number and a little in size.

It's not that bad yet, but recently I have been trying to remember to take them out at night to hopefully start to reverse the effects.

This is the first negative effect i've had from wearing the contacts. Other than that they still feel like i'm not even wearing them most of the time.

I haven't read the links you posted yet, but i'm going to look into them b/c i'm interested in finding out more about this and i'm also going to do some reading about the Silicone Hydrogel lenses that you mentioned. If they are better for extended wear I would definetly prefer them.



Quote:
Originally Posted by knotlob
In AllTracTurbo's case, he says he has worn contact lenses (Monthly disposable) for 13 months, 24/7. His lenses are Encore Premium/Coopervision Frequency 55 aspheric ones made from Methafilcon A. This has a relatively low Dk oxygen permeability value, so I don't think his optician would recommend wearing them for more than say 12-15 hours/day maximum, let alone 24 hours/day.
This is not true. Here is the information from Coopervision on the contacts.

[url]http://www.coopervision.com/data/hongkong_new/documents/frequency_55.pdf[/url]

Quote:
Originally Posted by coopervision document linked above (Bottom left of page 2)
EXTENDED WEAR: (greater than 24 hours, including
while asleep) Frequency 55 lenses are suitable for
extended wear. The wearing time should be determined by
the eye care practitioner.

EXTENDED WEAR LENSES MUST BE
REMOVED, CLEANED, AND DISINFECTED AT LEAST
ONCE EVERY 7 DAYS, as recommended by the eye care
practitioner. With extended wear, there may be increased
risks of eye problems, such as irritation, infection, corneal
thickening, and corneal ulcers. Therefore, proper contact
lens care and periodic checkups are extremely important.
Just like I have said in some of my other posts where people are asking about dry eyes. I personally do not have problems with my eyes drying out when I sleep, but that doesn't mean that everyone can wear theirs overnight. Thats why it says above that "wearing time should be determined by the eye care practitioner".

If someone has dry eyes during the day and uses eye drops, I highly doubt they are gong to be able to wear any type of contact lens when they sleep.

I know it also says that the lenses need to be cleaned every 7 days and you need to see your eye doctor on a regular basis for extended wear. I personally have decided to not follow those warnings and I am not advising anyone else to do so.



Quote:
Originally Posted by dboo
You have to give your eyes a rest sometimes. I couldn't do that even if I really wanted to. I can't sleep with my contacts in because I like to rub my eyes when I wake up. One time I forgot I had my contacts in and rubbed my eyes and that hurt.
Why does it hurt to rub your eyes with contacts in? If they hurt when you do that, I think they might be dried out and stuck to your eyes. I've rubbed my eyes with my contacts in numerous times and it never hurts. The only problem i've had is if you rub a bit too much and knock the contact out.


Again, I am not a professional and anything I say is my personal opinion and experiances. I am not advising anyone to wear their contacts other than as prescribed by ther eye practitioner.
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Old 01-18-2010, 03:22 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Senior
 
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Posts: 369
Default You're Not Making Any Sense

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTracTurbo View Post
I just wanted to give an update and say thanks to knotlob for finding this information.

It's been about 10 months since I changed the contacts that I wore for over a year and since then I have been changing each pair about every 4 months.

I know it also says that the lenses need to be cleaned every 7 days and you need to see your eye doctor on a regular basis for extended wear. I personally have decided to not follow those warnings and I am not advising anyone else to do so.

Again, I am not a professional and anything I say is my personal opinion and experiances. I am not advising anyone to wear their contacts other than as prescribed by ther eye practitioner.
Why, oh why, are you torturing your eyes so? You're refusing to change your contacts on time and you're not going to see an eye doctor who can help you with the damage you're certainly causing. Forgive me, but are you hoping people will read your posts and tell you how stupid you're being? Are you asking for abuse? Is this some weird way of getting attention? You're there saying "don't do what I'm doing" so why are YOU doing it? If you know it's risky, why don't you take your own advice and quit wearing contact lenses? Judging by your posts, you seem fairly intelligent. Why are you being so stubborn? It can't be because you're just lazy. A lazy person will get up when someone yells at them to get busy. This is beyond that.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2010, 04:54 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Ph.D.
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: near Hamburg, Germany
Posts: 2,144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTracTurbo View Post
I just wanted to give an update and say thanks to knotlob for finding this information.

It's been about 10 months since I changed the contacts that I wore for over a year and since then I have been changing each pair about every 4 months.

A few months after posting that thread I did notice small red veins showing up in the whites of my eyes. Over time they did gradually start to get a little bigger and I figured this was b/c my eyes were being starved of oxygen from the contacts and they were compensating by bringing more blood to my eyes.

I tried looking this up online to see if there would be any harmful effects from it and all I found was a lot of other people that had the same issue (most of them wore contacts), but there was no information on it. A lot of them talked with their eye doctors and still no solid information.

Without any good information I just thought maybe they veins or capillaries would get to a certain size where there would be enough blood flow to compensate for the missing oxygen that the contacts are blocking.

I continued to wear the contacts 24 hours a day and I still do, but the veins in the whites of my eyes still are very slowly staring to increase in number and a little in size.

It's not that bad yet, but recently I have been trying to remember to take them out at night to hopefully start to reverse the effects.

This is the first negative effect i've had from wearing the contacts. Other than that they still feel like i'm not even wearing them most of the time.

I haven't read the links you posted yet, but i'm going to look into them b/c i'm interested in finding out more about this and i'm also going to do some reading about the Silicone Hydrogel lenses that you mentioned. If they are better for extended wear I would definetly prefer them.




This is not true. Here is the information from Coopervision on the contacts.

[url]http://www.coopervision.com/data/hongkong_new/documents/frequency_55.pdf[/url]


Just like I have said in some of my other posts where people are asking about dry eyes. I personally do not have problems with my eyes drying out when I sleep, but that doesn't mean that everyone can wear theirs overnight. Thats why it says above that "wearing time should be determined by the eye care practitioner".

If someone has dry eyes during the day and uses eye drops, I highly doubt they are gong to be able to wear any type of contact lens when they sleep.

I know it also says that the lenses need to be cleaned every 7 days and you need to see your eye doctor on a regular basis for extended wear. I personally have decided to not follow those warnings and I am not advising anyone else to do so.




Why does it hurt to rub your eyes with contacts in? If they hurt when you do that, I think they might be dried out and stuck to your eyes. I've rubbed my eyes with my contacts in numerous times and it never hurts. The only problem i've had is if you rub a bit too much and knock the contact out.


Again, I am not a professional and anything I say is my personal opinion and experiances. I am not advising anyone to wear their contacts other than as prescribed by ther eye practitioner.
Hello AllTracTurbo

I have read your post and the Coopervision Frequency 55 insert (the USA & Hong Kong ones).

First of all there, is absolutely no way that I would accept that a Lens with a Dk value of 18 can be considered an extended wear lens and frankly I find it quite unbelievable that Coopervision state that for some users it can be an extended wear lens, if approved by the wearer's eyes care specialist. I do note that the information leaflet is rather generic as I have read very similar info leaflets elsewhere, for lenses other than Frequency 55.

Coopervision, Ciba Vision and Johnson & Johnson have gone to a lot of trouble and expense obtaining FDA extended wear certification for their high end silicone hydrogel lenses. These FDA approved lenses have oxygen permeability values of the order of seven times more than the Frequency 55 (which is low even by non-silicone hydrogel lens material standards).

I will make a point of contacting Coopervision and asking for the logic in this statement.

You say you have not read all the links yet. I suggest you do. I have posted an explanation of what causes neovascularisation and it's consequences on this forum, based on info I found on the Internet (scientific papers, doctor's advice, etc).

You say you can see neovascularisation continuing to develop and yet you continue to wear the lenses probably too long (even though you now say you try to remember to take them out at night - at least that's a step in the right direction). Does the neovascularisation not tell you something is wrong? This process is NOT reversible, nor are you likely to feel the damage that is occurring silently while you wear your lenses in this manner.

If you reduced the wear time or switched to a high oxygen permeable Silicone Hydrogel lens, the process would stop, but the capillaries will remain as ghost capillaries and if they are in your cornea, then your eye sight is probably already permanently impaired. At least you say you may now consider Silicone Hydrogel lenses.

Anyone who wears their lenses on an Extended wear basis, even the newer Silicone Hydrogel lenses and with approval from their eye care specialist, is 5 times more likely to develop corneal ulceration, etc. than people who wear their lenses only while they are awake. I wear Biofinity lenses, which are approved for Extended Wear, but I have no intention of wearing them on an Extended Wear basis, unless I have a real need to do so.

Members on Lens 101 can only warn you of the dangers of wearing the lenses the way that you do. You can then make an informed decision as to whether you wish to continue wearing the lenses in this way, or reduce the wear time/lens change frequency to that of the manufacturer's recommendations. But at the end of the day, they are your eyes and your eyes only, that will bear the consequences, no one else's.

How often do you have your eyes checked by your contact lens eye specialist - not often enough by your own admission?

Did he/she say you could wear the lenses 24/7 for a year or so, or even 4 months? If not, then you are ignoring Coopervision's basic advice, which you so proudly hold high to justify your lens wear regime.

You are effectively 'flying blind' without your annual eye care specialist's checks, especially when you indulge in such an extreme contact lens wearing regime. 'Flying Blind' is not intended as a pun, but it is likely to be much too close to the truth for comfort.

But as I said already, it's your own decision, which you may or may not later regret.

knotlob
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Old 01-18-2010, 07:52 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheatgrass View Post
Forgive me, but are you hoping people will read your posts and tell you how stupid you're being? Are you asking for abuse? Is this some weird way of getting attention?
No i'm not trying to get attention. I'm actually just the opposite and don't like communicating with anyone. I like to be left alone. If I wanted attention, I would have made more than 21 posts in the 10 months that I have been a member here.

Before I became a member here I wore my contacts and had no problems with them. I started wearing them longer and longer b/c I never had any problems and didn't wan't to spend the money to keep replacing them (This was partly b/c I had no source of income and was trying to save the money I had).

After wearing them for probably 1 1/2 years changing them every 2 months without taking them out, I still had no problems. Then I ran out of contacts and had no insurance to pay to see my eye doctor and not much money. After that, I guess you can say "out of sight, out of mind", even though they were covering my eyes. I just left the pair I had in and never had any problems. I ended up wearing them for over a year with no problems untill I lost one.

At that point I started looking up how to order them online to see if I can get them without a prescription. This brought me to sites talking about people that order their contacts online and neglect to get regular eye exams and the damage it can cause.

If you read my first post here: http://www.lens101.com/general-eye-health/56873-wore-one-pair-contacs-24-7-over-year.html

You'll see that I came here to look for advise from people that might have more knowledge about contacts than I do. To see if I might have done any damage to my eyes without me knowing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alltracturbo, from my first post, url above
I was just wondering if I did do damage to my eyes, would I be able to tell without seeing an eye doctor? I would imagine there would be symptoms and I would notice an infection, but what about scratches? They have been out since yesterday and my eyes feel completely normal.
Then after posting that and doing some more research online, I still didn't really see any problems with wearing them for an extended period other than if you had dry eyes or got an infection. I never got an infection in the 3 years I was wearing them so that didn't make me that worried and and I don't have any dry eye symptoms at all.

Then a few months later I noticed the first sign of something wrong which was the small veins showing up in the whites of my eyes. Like I explained in my post above, I read about this online and found a lot of people that have the same problem and there was no information on weather it was bad or not.

Heres the thread I read. It's 191 pages and I think I read through most of it.

http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=817

From reading that all these people had the same problem and none of them reported any harmful effects from it, I assumed it was just the veins that were already in your eyes getting bigger to transport more blood to your eyes to compensate for the missing oxygen from wearing the contacts.

I was able to order more contacts. I continued to wear them and ended up changing them about every 4 months.

Then I just remembered about this site and decided to see if there were any replies in the threads I was part. Came to this thread and found out that what is happening to my eyes is actually going to cause damage.

Previous to reading this page just today, I didn't think I was doing any damage b/c I didn't see or feel anything that would lead me to believe I was harming my eyes. Since reading this I have taken them out and only plan on wearing them when I need to, such as driving.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheatgrass View Post
You're there saying "don't do what I'm doing" so why are YOU doing it?
I'm saying not to do what i'm doing b/c if I don't people will complain saying that i'm giving people bad advise. When really i'm not giving anyone advise. I'm just explaining my experiance with contacts, giving my opinions, and asking for other peoples advise and opinions about damage caused by wearing contacts longer than prescribed.

I really don't care what anyone does with there contacts. It's their life and their eyes. They can kill themselves for all I care. One more wouldn't make that much of a difference on top of the other 150,000 that die every day (meaningless internet stastic, no source).



Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheatgrass View Post
If you know it's risky, why don't you take your own advice and quit wearing contact lenses?
I didn't think there was any real risk untill today.(Explained above)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheatgrass View Post
A lazy person will get up when someone yells at them to get busy.
Depends on who's doing the yelling.
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Old 01-18-2010, 08:32 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Freshman
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Hello AllTracTurbo

I have read your post and the Coopervision Frequency 55 insert (the USA & Hong Kong ones).

First of all there, is absolutely no way that I would accept that a Lens with a Dk value of 18 can be considered an extended wear lens and frankly I find it quite unbelievable that Coopervision state that for some users it can be an extended wear lens, if approved by the wearer's eyes care specialist. I do note that the information leaflet is rather generic as I have read very similar info leaflets elsewhere, for lenses other than Frequency 55.

Coopervision, Ciba Vision and Johnson & Johnson have gone to a lot of trouble and expense obtaining FDA extended wear certification for their high end silicone hydrogel lenses. These FDA approved lenses have oxygen permeability values of the order of seven times more than the Frequency 55 (which is low even by non-silicone hydrogel lens material standards).

I will make a point of contacting Coopervision and asking for the logic in this statement.
Your probably right. I just remembered reading that last year and took their word for it. I don't know anything about the DK value so I just posted their info. And after reading the info you posted I have taken them out.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
You say you have not read all the links yet. I suggest you do. I have posted an explanation of what causes neovascularisation and it's consequences on this forum, based on info I found on the Internet (scientific papers, doctor's advice, etc).
I now have. Thanks for the info. I guess when I was doing searches for "veins in whites of eyes", I needed the word neovascularization. That gets much more informative and scientific results.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
You say you can see neovascularisation continuing to develop and yet you continue to wear the lenses probably too long (even though you now say you try to remember to take them out at night - at least that's a step in the right direction). Does the neovascularisation not tell you something is wrong? This process is NOT reversible, nor are you likely to feel the damage that is occurring silently while you wear your lenses in this manner.
I continued to wear them b/c I didn't find any info that convinced me it was harmful. I have taken them out since reading the info you posted.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
If you reduced the wear time or switched to a high oxygen permeable Silicone Hydrogel lens, the process would stop, but the capillaries will remain as ghost capillaries and if they are in your cornea, then your eye sight is probably already permanently impaired. At least you say you may now consider Silicone Hydrogel lenses.
I didn't know they existed untill I read your post. If I get more contacts I would definetly prefer them if they breath better. I just haven't read anything about them yet.

I was also thinking of getting laser surgery, but I don't like the idea of them cutting into my eye. Was thinking about PRK. I'm sure most of the surgeries go fine, but I have read and seen video where it doesn't go so good. Plus I think I remember reading that a high percentage of patients have dry eyes after and some see halo's. That made me wan't to wait and hopefully the technology will get better in time, i'm in no rush.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Members on Lens 101 can only warn you of the dangers of wearing the lenses the way that you do. You can then make an informed decision as to whether you wish to continue wearing the lenses in this way, or reduce the wear time/lens change frequency to that of the manufacturer's recommendations. But at the end of the day, they are your eyes and your eyes only, that will bear the consequences, no one else's.
Thats perfectly fine with me. I don't expect anything else and wouldn't tolerate anything else.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
How often do you have your eyes checked by your contact lens eye specialist - not often enough by your own admission?
Only wen't back for one exam, I think a year after I first got them. Probably been almost 3 years.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Did he/she say you could wear the lenses 24/7 for a year or so, or even 4 months? If not, then you are ignoring Coopervision's basic advice, which you so proudly hold high to justify your lens wear regime.
I think he said 1 month if taken out every night and 2 weeks if worn 24 hours a day and cleaned after 7 days.

I never claimed to follow this or coopervision's advice. I was just stating the facts. I said that in my earlier post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alltracturbo
I know it also says that the lenses need to be cleaned every 7 days and you need to see your eye doctor on a regular basis for extended wear. I personally have decided to not follow those warnings and I am not advising anyone else to do so.
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 01-19-2010, 04:19 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Ph.D.
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: near Hamburg, Germany
Posts: 2,144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTracTurbo View Post
Your probably right. I just remembered reading that last year and took their word for it. I don't know anything about the DK value so I just posted their info. And after reading the info you posted I have taken them out.




I now have. Thanks for the info. I guess when I was doing searches for "veins in whites of eyes", I needed the word neovascularization. That gets much more informative and scientific results.




I continued to wear them b/c I didn't find any info that convinced me it was harmful. I have taken them out since reading the info you posted.




I didn't know they existed untill I read your post. If I get more contacts I would definetly prefer them if they breath better. I just haven't read anything about them yet.

I was also thinking of getting laser surgery, but I don't like the idea of them cutting into my eye. Was thinking about PRK. I'm sure most of the surgeries go fine, but I have read and seen video where it doesn't go so good. Plus I think I remember reading that a high percentage of patients have dry eyes after and some see halo's. That made me wan't to wait and hopefully the technology will get better in time, i'm in no rush.




Thats perfectly fine with me. I don't expect anything else and wouldn't tolerate anything else.




Only wen't back for one exam, I think a year after I first got them. Probably been almost 3 years.




I think he said 1 month if taken out every night and 2 weeks if worn 24 hours a day and cleaned after 7 days.

I never claimed to follow this or coopervision's advice. I was just stating the facts. I said that in my earlier post.
Hello AllTracTurbo

Thanks for your reply.

I am glad for your sake that you are making some changes to the way you wear your contact lenses. I hope you have not already done too much irreversible damage to your eyes.

You say a number of things here:

I didn't know anything about silicone hydrogel lenses
I didn't know I had capillaries growing into the whites of my eyes
I didn't know they were dangerous, once I observed them
I would possibly consider laser surgery, but I have read bad things about it

All these things would have been brought to your attention immediately by your eye care specialist IF you had regular annual checks. They would also probably have advised you to trial silicone hydrogel lenses.

An eye care specialist will be able to advise you on whether you are a suitable candidate for laser surgery. I think the procedure has developed considerably in the last 20 years. My sister had both eyes done, many many years ago and it was painful - don't know if they even used laser then.

A brother in law and a cousin have both had their eyes done by laser, maybe 4-5 years ago and it was much less painful and I think they were able to use the eye again within a couple of days or less. It's all controlled by computer and very quick I believe.

However, not everyone is suitable for laser treatment. I was recently at a new eye doctor and they had me have a Pentocam scan to check my corneas for defects, because I have worn contacts for circa 35 years. Hard lenses initially, but mainly high water content soft lenses. They use they Pentocam scan to map the surface of the cornea, prior to laser surgery and if the cornea is too thin, etc. after wearing contact lenses too long/contact lens abuse, then it's a no and laser treatment is not possible.

By the way, I was told several years ago that I do have some ghost capillaries in the white of my eye, presumably caused by poor oxygen supply while wearing hard lenses or low Dk value soft lenses. As I said, they don't go away and I still have them.

knotlob
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 01-19-2010, 02:18 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Freshman
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
I didn't know anything about silicone hydrogel lenses
I didn't know I had capillaries growing into the whites of my eyes
I didn't know they were dangerous, once I observed them
I would possibly consider laser surgery, but I have read bad things about it

All these things would have been brought to your attention immediately by your eye care specialist IF you had regular annual checks. They would also probably have advised you to trial silicone hydrogel lenses.
I realize that now, but at the time I had no problems. The contacts felt just as good as they did they day they were put in, there was no complications, and my vision was not getting any worse.

I should have contacted my eye doctor after noticing the capillary growth, but as I said above, I didn't think it was anything serious since I found 190 pages of other people that have the same thing happening. Some of them talked with their eye doctors and they weren't able to help.

Actually, it was probably only about 100 pages when I read it. I should check out the rest of it and see what happened with them. They probably have figured out what it is by now, but if not, it would be a good idea to let them know.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
By the way, I was told several years ago that I do have some ghost capillaries in the white of my eye, presumably caused by poor oxygen supply while wearing hard lenses or low Dk value soft lenses. As I said, they don't go away and I still have them.
I read about that in some of the links you posted. They're still there, just drained of blood. Can you see them in a mirror or do you need magnification.



For the laser surgery, i'm only 22 and know nothing about what it was like 20 years ago. I was just talking about in the last maybe 5 years. Here's a few video's and a website I just found real quick.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=777729000454780483#

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8za3EH8V9TQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZHTJiOJK3Q

http://www.lasikcomplications.com/dryeye.htm


I don't think I would ever get the kind of lasik where they cut a flap off the surface of your eye, do the laser treatment and then put the flap back. I did some reading a couple years ago about the different types and decided PRK was the best at the time, but still not sure if I would wan't to do it.

They make a good point in the title of that last video "Why do eye doctors wear glasses?".Its a good question. I wonder what percent of the doctors that have bad eye sight and perform laser surgery actually get it themselves. Just like the vaccine companys, they wouldn't be caught dead taking their own vaccine filled with mercury and squalene.
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Old 01-19-2010, 04:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTracTurbo View Post
I realize that now, but at the time I had no problems. The contacts felt just as good as they did they day they were put in, there was no complications, and my vision was not getting any worse.

I should have contacted my eye doctor after noticing the capillary growth, but as I said above, I didn't think it was anything serious since I found 190 pages of other people that have the same thing happening. Some of them talked with their eye doctors and they weren't able to help.

Actually, it was probably only about 100 pages when I read it. I should check out the rest of it and see what happened with them. They probably have figured out what it is by now, but if not, it would be a good idea to let them know.






I read about that in some of the links you posted. They're still there, just drained of blood. Can you see them in a mirror or do you need magnification.



For the laser surgery, i'm only 22 and know nothing about what it was like 20 years ago. I was just talking about in the last maybe 5 years. Here's a few video's and a website I just found real quick.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=777729000454780483#

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8za3EH8V9TQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZHTJiOJK3Q

http://www.lasikcomplications.com/dryeye.htm


I don't think I would ever get the kind of lasik where they cut a flap off the surface of your eye, do the laser treatment and then put the flap back. I did some reading a couple years ago about the different types and decided PRK was the best at the time, but still not sure if I would wan't to do it.

They make a good point in the title of that last video "Why do eye doctors wear glasses?".Its a good question. I wonder what percent of the doctors that have bad eye sight and perform laser surgery actually get it themselves. Just like the vaccine companys, they wouldn't be caught dead taking their own vaccine filled with mercury and squalene.
Hello AllTracTurbo

Regarding the ghost capillaries, I can't say they are obvious and I cannot see them, but the opticians can see them and comment on them.

Regarding the LASIK surgery, the three people that I know who have had the surgery done (sister, cousin, brother in law) don't seem to have these problems shown in the videos, i.e. dry eyes, sore eyes, etc.

But in my sister's and my brother in law's case, their vision is no longer perfect and they need glasses. i.e. their vision was good after the LASIK, but as you get older, your eyesight changes and unless you want to have expensive LASIK again, then you need glasses or contacts.

I'm not surprised they quoted LASIK 'discount chains' in one of the clips $250 or whatever for LASIK on one eye should be a strong warning. In Europe I think the cost is now Euro 2000/eye ($2940) and that is much cheaper than it used to be.

Any medical procedure carries with it some element of risk. But I think I would skip the free gasoline and pay a bit extra for a proper expert medical procedure.

If you want to discuss LASIK, take a look at the section at the bottom of this forum.

knotlob
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Old 01-29-2010, 05:54 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
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Default A Contact Lens Christmas

So did Sana give anyone and contact-lens related goodies for Christmas? Maybe one of these?
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Old 04-18-2010, 09:17 PM
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in fact i clean my contact lens carefully and wash my hands very clean before i wear and take off, but when i go to eye test, doctor also tell me i should pay attention to my eye hygiene, especilly when i wear contact lens.
what can i do anything else for my eyes?
does anybody help me?
thanks
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Old 04-19-2010, 03:39 AM
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Originally Posted by gsshop View Post
in fact i clean my contact lens carefully and wash my hands very clean before i wear and take off, but when i go to eye test, doctor also tell me i should pay attention to my eye hygiene, especilly when i wear contact lens.
what can i do anything else for my eyes?
does anybody help me?
thanks
The main thing is to follow your eye doctor's/eye care specialist's advice.

If you have no infection problems, you are probably doing most things OK. Be sensible.

Washing and drying your hands before handling the contact lenses is probably the most important thing. Keep your nails trimmed and smooth - your lenses will last longer.

Follow the disinfection instructions rigorously. Always use proper contact lens solutions when handling your lenses. Never, never put the lenses in your mouth or use tap water to clean or re-wet your lenses. Make sure the solutions are within their use by date.

Don't share your lenses with anyone else (if they want to try the lenses).

Don't wear your contact lenses longer/day than your eye care professional recommends.

Stick to the recommendations for the number of day's wear your eye care professional recommends for the lens.

If your eyes become red or irritated, take the lenses out and clean them. If the problem persists, see your eye care professional.

Change or thoroughly wash/disinfect your lens case every 3 months max (or as otherwise recommended by the manufacturer).

Consider switching to a silicone hydrogel lens if you are using conventional hydrogel lenses (better oxygen permeability) - better eye health.

Avoid wearing contact lenses continuously, even the new silicone hydrogel lenses which are highly oxygen permeable. Your eye care specialist may say it is OK, but there is a 5 times greater risk of corneal ulcers and such like infections when you wear lenses 24/7. The risk is much higher if you also smoke. If you don't have a good reason for wearing your lenses 24/7, then don't!

If you swim, consider whether you want to wear your lenses in the water. Wear goggles (prescription or plain), consider Daily Disposable lenses, which can be changed after swimming to reduce any risk of infection. However, most opticians think the risk of loosing the lenses while swimming is higher than actually getting an infection.

There may be other points but that should cover most of the major issues.

knotlob
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:01 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Senior
 
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTracTurbo View Post
I realize that now, but at the time I had no problems. The contacts felt just as good as they did they day they were put in, there was no complications, and my vision was not getting any worse.

I should have contacted my eye doctor after noticing the capillary growth, but as I said above, I didn't think it was anything serious since I found 190 pages of other people that have the same thing happening.
It's been three months since we've hard from you on this thread, AllTracTurbo. How are you? Are you finally wearing your contact lenses according to your doctor's instructions?
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Old 04-26-2010, 03:56 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
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Default You Feel Fine, But You Might Not Be

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTracTurbo View Post
I realize that now, but at the time I had no problems. The contacts felt just as good as they did they day they were put in, there was no complications, and my vision was not getting any worse.

I should have contacted my eye doctor after noticing the capillary growth, but as I said above, I didn't think it was anything serious since I found 190 pages of other people that have the same thing happening. Some of them talked with their eye doctors and they weren't able to help.
I'm glad you're brave enough to admit that you need to change your ways. I hope your eyes have not been damaged by all the contact lens over wear.

You said "the contacts felt just as good as they did they day they were put in, there was no complications, and my vision was not getting any worse."

How many people have been hospitalized for a serious condition that was caught in time because someone went to their doctor for a routine check up? They're amazed and say "I feel fine, but here I am getting prepped for an emergency triple-bypass."

See your eye doctor every twelve months and have your eyes checked. That way you can have a much better chance of having any underlying conditions diagnosed in their early stages, even of you feel okay.
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Old 05-19-2010, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeRoberts View Post
I'm glad you're brave enough to admit that you need to change your ways. I hope your eyes have not been damaged by all the contact lens over wear.

You said "the contacts felt just as good as they did they day they were put in, there was no complications, and my vision was not getting any worse."

How many people have been hospitalized for a serious condition that was caught in time because someone went to their doctor for a routine check up? They're amazed and say "I feel fine, but here I am getting prepped for an emergency triple-bypass."

See your eye doctor every twelve months and have your eyes checked. That way you can have a much better chance of having any underlying conditions diagnosed in their early stages, even of you feel okay.
That's some good advice, Lee. Have your eyes checked frequently for any problems that might arise and have anything they might find corrected right away.
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Old 05-19-2010, 04:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeRoberts View Post
You said "the contacts felt just as good as they did they day they were put in, there was no complications, and my vision was not getting any worse."

How many people have been hospitalized for a serious condition that was caught in time because someone went to their doctor for a routine check up? They're amazed and say "I feel fine, but here I am getting prepped for an emergency triple-bypass."
That's a good example, Lee. Just because something doesn't hurt doesn't mean it's not doing damage. Everyone, please . . . follow your doctor's instructions on how long to wear your contact lenses before you replace them.
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Old 05-26-2010, 02:43 PM
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Default Does Your Eye Doctor Wear Glasses?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTracTurbo View Post
"Why do eye doctors wear glasses?".Its a good question. I wonder what percent of the doctors that have bad eye sight and perform laser surgery actually get it themselves. Just like the vaccine companys, they wouldn't be caught dead taking their own vaccine filled with mercury and squalene.
I don't know if this should be the beginning of a new thread or a continuation of this one, so I'll leave that up to our wise and benevolent Administrator.

Here's the question. How many of you are getting fitted for glasses or contacts by an eye doctor who wears glasses?
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Old 07-28-2010, 10:58 AM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
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Default Nobody

Quote:
Originally Posted by LP39A View Post
I don't know if this should be the beginning of a new thread or a continuation of this one, so I'll leave that up to our wise and benevolent Administrator.

Here's the question. How many of you are getting fitted for glasses or contacts by an eye doctor who wears glasses?
I guess nobody is being fitted for lenses by a spectacle-wearing doctor.
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Old 07-28-2010, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by LeeRoberts View Post
I guess nobody is being fitted for lenses by a spectacle-wearing doctor.
Several of the Eye Care Professionals I have come into contact with, wear spectacles. For some of the older ones, it may be reading glasses of course.

I noticed that almost everyone working in my new opticians branches wears glasses - even the very young ones. Almost as if they were modelling the frames!

knotlob
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Old 07-28-2010, 03:59 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
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Default Just Like Yours

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Several of the Eye Care Professionals I have come into contact with, wear spectacles. For some of the older ones, it may be reading glasses of course.

I noticed that almost everyone working in my new opticians branches wears glasses - even the very young ones. Almost as if they were modelling the frames!

knotlob
Hmm . . . how do you know they're not modeling the frames? It would be a great marketing technique.

"Okay, which frames would you like to try Mr. Knotlob?"

"Can I try on some like yours?"

"Oh, these old things?"
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Old 07-28-2010, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucyfur View Post
Hmm . . . how do you know they're not modeling the frames? It would be a great marketing technique.

"Okay, which frames would you like to try Mr. Knotlob?"

"Can I try on some like yours?"

"Oh, these old things?"
Or maybe I could try the frameless ones - I think they are called contact lenses

knotlob
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Old 08-27-2010, 09:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucyfur View Post
Hmm . . . how do you know they're not modeling the frames? It would be a great marketing technique.

"Okay, which frames would you like to try Mr. Knotlob?"

"Can I try on some like yours?"

"Oh, these old things?"
That would be a clever marketing strategy . . .

(In a breathy, Marilyn Monroe voice) "What would you like to try first? Frame style, that is . . . "
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Old 09-08-2010, 04:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckifera View Post
That would be a clever marketing strategy . . .

(In a breathy, Marilyn Monroe voice) "What would you like to try first? Frame style, that is . . . "
In the words of the late, great Jackie Gleason: "Haminahaminahaminahaminahaminahamina . . . "
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Old 09-09-2010, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeRoberts View Post
In the words of the late, great Jackie Gleason: "Haminahaminahaminahaminahaminahamina . . . "
I'm sayin' . . .
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Old 10-21-2010, 03:01 PM
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Default I Know a Little Bit About Them

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucyfur View Post
Hmm . . . how do you know they're not modeling the frames? It would be a great marketing technique.

"Okay, which frames would you like to try Mr. Knotlob?"

"Can I try on some like yours?"

"Oh, these old things?"
"Well if you insist, Mr. Knotlob.
These are Giorgio Armani 10 glasses. They're designed for men and women, and feature regular hinges and skull temples. Giorgio Armani 10 glasses are made of metal and manufactured in Italy. The frames are in the shape of a modified oval and have adjustable nose pads. Buy now and you can get a 1 year warranty.

Or . . . so I've heard. I don't pay attention to such things, really."
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Old 10-21-2010, 04:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckifera View Post
"Well if you insist, Mr. Knotlob.
These are Giorgio Armani 10 glasses. They're designed for men and women, and feature regular hinges and skull temples. Giorgio Armani 10 glasses are made of metal and manufactured in Italy. The frames are in the shape of a modified oval and have adjustable nose pads. Buy now and you can get a 1 year warranty.

Or . . . so I've heard. I don't pay attention to such things, really."
Actually I asked the girls in the opticians about the fact that all the employees seem to wear spectacles and they said it was because they were required to wear glasses as a condition of working there.

I guess it must be to make it easier for new spectacle wearers (especially young ones) to accept they have to wear spectacles, especially if the spectacles look good on the members of staff.

It sounds like that may be the norm here. Certainly spectacles are not normally considered 'cool' here, but of course there are plenty of attractive people wearing glasses.

knotlob
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Old 10-21-2010, 04:53 PM
Contact Lenses Forum - Bachelors Degree
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Actually I asked the girls in the opticians about the fact that all the employees seem to wear spectacles and they said it was because they were required to wear glasses as a condition of working there.

I guess it must be to make it easier for new spectacle wearers (especially young ones) to accept they have to wear spectacles, especially if the spectacles look good on the members of staff.

It sounds like that may be the norm here. Certainly spectacles are not normally considered 'cool' here, but of course there are plenty of attractive people wearing glasses.

knotlob
So wearing glasses is a condition of working in that optician's office huh? On the one hand it smacks of discrimination. but on the other hand, I'd hate to buy glasses from someone who wears contact lenses because glasses are ugly and nerdy.

What do they know?
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Old 10-21-2010, 05:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adric View Post
So wearing glasses is a condition of working in that optician's office huh? On the one hand it smacks of discrimination. but on the other hand, I'd hate to buy glasses from someone who wears contact lenses because glasses are ugly and nerdy.

What do they know?
It's not really discrimination - they don't have to be half blind. I suspect that many of them have plano lenses in their spectacles and they look good .

knotlob
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