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  #1  
Old 05-16-2008, 04:54 PM
nakedeyes nakedeyes is offline
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Default Homemade Contact Lens Solution

Did you think I was going to give you a recipe?

I'm not. In fact, this is a warning. I've seen posts on other sites that give instructions on How to Make Your Own Contact Lens Solution. One included salt and vinegar!

DO NOT make your own solution. Either buy some more or wear glasses until you can get to the store. Saving money is one thing. Saving your eyesight is something else entirely.

Naked Eyes, signing off.
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  #2  
Old 05-17-2008, 07:40 PM
skatss skatss is offline
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Default

I thought you were going to give some kind of recipe for homemade contact lens solution and I was going to warn others about using something like that. It's never safe to put anything homemade into your eyes. Good post.
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  #3  
Old 02-20-2009, 10:20 PM
chemist chemist is offline
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Default make your own contact lens cleaning solution

the following is basically the same formula as the AOSept line which is essentially hydrogen peroxide. this is a good approach since hydrogen peroxide you buy at the drugstore is a strong antibacterial and fungicide. It works well to sterilize the lenses, and is completely neutralized with the platinum catalyst using the commercial cases. Pure salt is added to make the lens compatible with your eyes.

if you think there is something wrong with this, read the AOcept patent. Note that the "stabilizers" are there primarily to ensure that the solution is stable over extremes of temperature and to "improve comfort" when putting the lens in the eye.

Solve these problems yourself by washing the lenses with saline before placing in eye and only use the proposed solution at home and use the commercial grade when traveling.

1) first get a cleaning/storage bottle with a platinum catalyst. These are included in AOSept hydrogen-peroxide based cleaning systems

2) obtain standard 3% hydrogen peroxide from the drugstore and pure salt ( non-iodized, no anti-caking additive - kosher salt works )

3) fill container with the hydrogen peroxide, do not dilute.

4) add about 20 grains ( tiny pieces ) of salt

5) as stated above, you may need to wash with saline in the morning.

this mix will save you hundreds of dollars a year.

note also that you can use a "unizyme" tablet every week or so to prolong the usefulness of soft lenses so you don't have to throw them out so often.
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  #4  
Old 02-22-2009, 04:40 AM
tierialogy tierialogy is offline
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Default

Two post warning and another posts a recipe. Better not follow it, though. I won't try to save money now and spend a lot more later for eye surgery.
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  #5  
Old 02-22-2009, 08:59 AM
chemist chemist is offline
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Default

I'd simply point out that the formula is the same as the solution that is sold in stores by the thousands of units, and none of the negative comments in this thread are based upon authoritative, scientifically based research.

I'd also appreciate you providing information as to how eye infections are addressed with surgery.
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  #6  
Old 02-23-2009, 10:01 AM
Ricardo Ricardo is offline
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Default

This is an interesting topic.

I can imagine that some people could comfortably mix their own contact lense solution.

I'd do my homework meticulously before I tried it, personally.
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  #7  
Old 02-23-2009, 10:48 AM
RedeyeJedi RedeyeJedi is offline
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Default Making Your Own Cleaning Solution

Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
I'd simply point out that the formula is the same as the solution that is sold in stores by the thousands of units . . .
So YOU say.

Am I going to take the advice of some random person on the Internet, or am I going to play it safe with my vision?

That's right, I'm going to play it safe.

It's one thing to use a recipe for cookies that turn out to taste lousy, but it's another thing to use instructions I got from a stranger for something I'm going to put in my eyes.

You may be right about your recipe, but I'm not willing to risk my eyesight. I'll just go the the store and buy some solution. Simple as that.
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  #8  
Old 02-24-2009, 05:38 AM
baby22nai baby22nai is offline
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The optometrist don't really advice to make then use homemade eye contacts because it may cause you some infections which is severe.
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  #9  
Old 02-24-2009, 07:39 AM
chemist chemist is offline
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no one is forcing you to do this. however, I'm sure that there are many folks that are reading this thread that read my post closely and recognize the implications of using the hydrogen peroxide approach, which is the same approach used by the commercial products.

I will also simply point out that the manufacturers of these products are making huge profits by selling $0.50 of peroxide and salt for $10.

as an interesting side note, you will notice that there is no "expiration date" on hydrogen peroxide based contact lens bottles used for sterilization of the lenses. this means that the manufacturers consider the peroxide solution to be strong enough to eliminate any harmful bacteria from the cases essentially forever.

I'd hope that what this implies for the lenses themselves is clear.
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  #10  
Old 02-24-2009, 07:50 AM
lovian05 lovian05 is offline
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i really thought that you'll gonna give a homemade recipe of contact lens solution. yeah, it's not safe to do your own solution, it'll cause harm in our eyesight.
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  #11  
Old 02-24-2009, 11:53 AM
chemist chemist is offline
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just to be completely clear, the information provided above is for CLEANING solution ONLY. This is the solution used in the lens case with the platinum catalyst inside,

it is In No Way to be used on the eye, and is not a replacement for sterile saline solution used for wetting.
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  #12  
Old 04-28-2009, 04:12 PM
nakedeyes nakedeyes is offline
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Default Homemade Contact Lens Solution?

Wow, look at this thread that has developed. What have we learned from this thread, boys and girls?
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  #13  
Old 05-12-2009, 05:29 PM
chemist chemist is offline
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Default improvements on formula for lens cleaning solution

I have received a lot of email from folks thanking me for the information regarding a low cost soft-lens cleaning solution. some have reported that it has been difficult to get the exactly right amount of salt into the small lens cleaning case.

the following is a practical approach to making a large batch of an isotonic solution.

1) go to walmart and buy "neilmed" refill packets used in their sinus cleaning product. These are small packets, each with exactly the correct mix to produce an isotonic solution with 8oz of water. They are also USP ( U.S. pharmaceutical ) quality, which mean there a no contaminants. A box of 50 costs something like $8

2) while you are there, pick up a 32 oz. bottle of peroxide. for $0.88 - that's the big one.

3) also, smirk at the pre-made solutions that cost $10 or more for 16oz.

4) put 4 envelopes into the peroxide.

keep in your bathroom and use as needed in your lens cleaning case. ( this HAS TO be a case with a platinum catalyst )

keep in a cool, dark place ( under the sink.. )

this approach brings the cost down to $0.50 per 16oz. or 1/20 the cost of the pre-made solution.

bye for now.
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  #14  
Old 10-28-2009, 05:02 PM
nakedeyes nakedeyes is offline
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Default Is This Safe

Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
I have received a lot of email from folks thanking me for the information regarding a low cost soft-lens cleaning solution. some have reported that it has been difficult to get the exactly right amount of salt into the small lens cleaning case.

the following is a practical approach to making a large batch of an isotonic solution.

1) go to walmart and buy "neilmed" refill packets used in their sinus cleaning product. These are small packets, each with exactly the correct mix to produce an isotonic solution with 8oz of water. They are also USP ( U.S. pharmaceutical ) quality, which mean there a no contaminants. A box of 50 costs something like $8

2) while you are there, pick up a 32 oz. bottle of peroxide. for $0.88 - that's the big one.

3) also, smirk at the pre-made solutions that cost $10 or more for 16oz.

4) put 4 envelopes into the peroxide.

keep in your bathroom and use as needed in your lens cleaning case. ( this HAS TO be a case with a platinum catalyst )

keep in a cool, dark place ( under the sink.. )

this approach brings the cost down to $0.50 per 16oz. or 1/20 the cost of the pre-made solution.

bye for now.
OK, is this really safe?

It may cost more to just buy the solution, but at least I know the right ingredients are in the bottle and they've been mixed properly. Getting a recipe from the Internet is SO risky. The person who posted it might have gotten something wrong, accidentally or on purpose. You never know, these days. Then you're going to use it on contact lenses? Something you put in your eyes?

Even if the recipe is exactly right, you might make a mistake in following it, so I would advise buying the solution already made. That's worth the $1.12 saved doing your way, or even the $11.12 saved if you were to buy two 16 ounce bottles to make it 32 oz.

Your method will cost about $8.88 for 32 oz, so you say ($8.00 for the peroxide and $0.88 for the neilmed packets). How is that 1/20th the price of two $10.00 bottles of pre-made solution? Last time I checked, $8.88 is just over 1/3 of $20.00.
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  #15  
Old 10-29-2009, 08:42 AM
chemist chemist is offline
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1) the formula is directly obtained from the published scientific literature.
2) it uses off-the shelf ingredients that are all approved for pharmaceutical use
3) it is designed for folks with the same level of skill required to make pudding in the kitchen.
4) there have been no postings of any adverse reactions, which there can't be since that would indicate something wrong with the commercial formulas
5) you got the math wrong. you may not be a good candidate to use this formula based upon that fact alone.

just to make sure everyone understands:

the 32oz bottle of peroxide is 88 cents, not $8

50 packages of salt is $8 which is 16 cents per package

four packages needed = 64 cents per 32oz bottle

total cost for solution is 88 cents + 64 cents = $1.52

cost of 16oz bottle of solution = $12
two bottles of purchased solution = 32 oz = $24

improvement in cost = $24 / $1.52 = 15x

smirk is free.
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  #16  
Old 10-29-2009, 09:19 AM
SandiStix SandiStix is offline
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Default Keep on Smirking

Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
1) the formula is directly obtained from the published scientific literature.
2) it uses off-the shelf ingredients that are all approved for pharmaceutical use
3) it is designed for folks with the same level of skill required to make pudding in the kitchen.
4) there have been no postings of any adverse reactions, which there can't be since that would indicate something wrong with the commercial formulas
5) you got the math wrong. you may not be a good candidate to use this formula based upon that fact alone.

just to make sure everyone understands:

the 32oz bottle of peroxide is 88 cents, not $8

50 packages of salt is $8 which is 16 cents per package

four packages needed = 64 cents per 32oz bottle

total cost for solution is 88 cents + 64 cents = $1.52

cost of 16oz bottle of solution = $12
two bottles of purchased solution = 32 oz = $24

improvement in cost = $24 / $1.52 = 15x

smirk is free.
Where's your "published scientific literature" Oh Smirking One?
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  #17  
Old 10-31-2009, 11:20 AM
chemist chemist is offline
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as requested -

the following article provides the data showing that peroxide is the active agent in all cleansers and that all other ingredients are purely for stabilization and long term storage

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC90597/

patent 4812173 is one of many that discuss the actual formula for which salt is given in the percentage as indicated in the provided formula, along with extensive scientific references. the use of other trace additives to extend lifetime of the solution is also discussed.
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  #18  
Old 11-17-2009, 02:33 PM
nakedeyes nakedeyes is offline
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Default Calling All Eye Care Professionals

Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
as requested -

the following article provides the data showing that peroxide is the active agent in all cleansers and that all other ingredients are purely for stabilization and long term storage

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC90597/

patent 4812173 is one of many that discuss the actual formula for which salt is given in the percentage as indicated in the provided formula, along with extensive scientific references. the use of other trace additives to extend lifetime of the solution is also discussed.
I skimmed over the article provided at this link and there is a lot of scientific jargon, but I think I got the gist of it. This article is about a study that was done testing the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide in disinfecting contact lenses. The tests seem to indicate that hydrogen peroxide does the job rather well. But . . .

The solutions tested were, to quote from the article, "six commercially available hydrogen peroxide-based contact lens disinfection solutions," not something from an on-line recipe. The discussion in this thread, as I understand it, is whether or not it's safe to use a formula found on an open forum for contact lens cleansing solution, not the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide as a contact lens disinfectant. I say it's not safe. Buy your solution, don't try to manufacture it yourself. It's not that expensive, really. If you think contact lens solution is too expensive, maybe you should consider wearing glasses.

If there are any actual eye care professionals who could sign in and say they would be willing to give their patients the formula given here in this thread, I'd be very interested in your input.
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  #19  
Old 11-17-2009, 05:08 PM
chemist chemist is offline
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not sure why you might be misinterpreting my post. The first article was sited to prove that hydrogen peroxide is the ONLY active ingredient and that it is very effective. This point is made very clear by the authors

the second patent addresses the salt and trace elements in commercial formulas, why they are there etc. I believe that my argument regarding the formula, effectiveness and safety are all reflected in the scientific evidence presented as requested.

I can only expect that other readers of this forum will recognize good data when it is provided.
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  #20  
Old 11-17-2009, 05:24 PM
herbking herbking is offline
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Default Good Data?

Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
I can only expect that other readers of this forum will recognize good data when it is provided.
We'll see. We haven't heard from them yet.
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  #21  
Old 11-22-2009, 06:18 PM
Knotlob Knotlob is offline
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Interesting post by Chemist.

Actually I have been making my own Hydrogen Peroxide solutions for over 20 years. I now buy 30% peroxide (strongest available) in Analar Grade (i.e. pharmaceutical grade). I dilute it to 3% (i.e. 1 part peroxide to 9 parts pure water). The water I am using is Ultra pure from chemical laboratories - much purer that the water that the Contact Lens Solution suppliers use to make the commercial stuff. I add Analar Grade salt to make the isotonic concentration suitable for the eye.

I do buy Commercial neutralising solution. I don't particularly like the AOSept Catalyst. This is of course iso-tonically balanced for the eyes as well.

Opticians throw up their hands in horror warning of mercury contamination, the end of the world, etc. etc. but as said, I am using Analar grade peroxide solution and salt plus ultra pure water so there is no significant source of mercury or other contaminants. The peroxide is a strong antiseptic so that takes care of any biological impurities, etc.

Perhaps in time, pharmacies will get more reluctant to supply strong peroxide as this is a potential bomb making material, although the quantities required for the contact lenses are small.

I do have Chemistry/Chemical Engineering/Environmental Management Degree level training so I know how to mix the lens solutions and the relevant safety precautions.

knotlob
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  #22  
Old 11-23-2009, 09:42 AM
SandiStix SandiStix is offline
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Default Too Risky

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Interesting post by Chemist.

Actually I have been making my own Hydrogen Peroxide solutions for over 20 years. I now buy 30% peroxide (strongest available) in Analar Grade (i.e. pharmaceutical grade). I dilute it to 3% (i.e. 1 part peroxide to 9 parts pure water). The water I am using is Ultra pure from chemical laboratories - much purer that the water that the Contact Lens Solution suppliers use to make the commercial stuff. I add Analar Grade salt to make the isotonic concentration suitable for the eye.

I do buy Commercial neutralising solution. I don't particularly like the AOSept Catalyst. This is of course iso-tonically balanced for the eyes as well.

Opticians throw up their hands in horror warning of mercury contamination, the end of the world, etc. etc. but as said, I am using Analar grade peroxide solution and salt plus ultra pure water so there is no significant source of mercury or other contaminants. The peroxide is a strong antiseptic so that takes care of any biological impurities, etc.

Perhaps in time, pharmacies will get more reluctant to supply strong peroxide as this is a potential bomb making material, although the quantities required for the contact lenses are small.

I do have Chemistry/Chemical Engineering/Environmental Management Degree level training so I know how to mix the lens solutions and the relevant safety precautions.

knotlob
Thank you for your contribution to this rather heated debate. Here's my concern, though.

You have a high degree of training and you know what you're doing. My concern is that Joe Schmo will come along and read this thread with out the benefit of training and experience and decide to mix up his own batch of solution with really bad results.
It would be like a professional stuntman having a TV show where he says "Here's how you do it, kids!" It's irresponsible to encourage the general public to make their own solution for cleaning their contact lenses. It's far too risky. I would feel really bad if someone were to hurt themselves while trying to follow these instructions. Wouldn't you?
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  #23  
Old 11-23-2009, 11:15 AM
Knotlob Knotlob is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SandiStix View Post
Thank you for your contribution to this rather heated debate. Here's my concern, though.

You have a high degree of training and you know what you're doing. My concern is that Joe Schmo will come along and read this thread with out the benefit of training and experience and decide to mix up his own batch of solution with really bad results.
It would be like a professional stuntman having a TV show where he says "Here's how you do it, kids!" It's irresponsible to encourage the general public to make their own solution for cleaning their contact lenses. It's far too risky. I would feel really bad if someone were to hurt themselves while trying to follow these instructions. Wouldn't you?
Hi SandiStix

Yes, I absolutely agree with your post. As they say on some of these TV Programmes when someone does something apparently life threatening or dangerous, 'Remember folks. Don't try this at home'

I don't advise Mr or Mrs Average to go and make up their own lens solutions - in fact most couldn't be bothered. In the case of Daily Disposables, it isn't even necessary I guess.

But, yes, the warning is indeed valid. Point well made. Thanks.

knotlob
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  #24  
Old 11-23-2009, 05:24 PM
BettyBoop BettyBoop is offline
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Default Thanks For Your Grace and Humility

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Hi SandiStix

Yes, I absolutely agree with your post. As they say on some of these TV Programmes when someone does something apparently life threatening or dangerous, 'Remember folks. Don't try this at home'

I don't advise Mr or Mrs Average to go and make up their own lens solutions - in fact most couldn't be bothered. In the case of Daily Disposables, it isn't even necessary I guess.

But, yes, the warning is indeed valid. Point well made. Thanks.

knotlob
Hi knotlob. I have to say I'm impressed with the humility with which you responded to Sandistix' posting. Well done.

Chemist seems to be a little more stubborn.
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  #25  
Old 01-04-2010, 04:16 PM
RedeyeJedi RedeyeJedi is offline
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Default What Have We Learned?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BettyBoop View Post
Hi knotlob. I have to say I'm impressed with the humility with which you responded to Sandistix' posting. Well done.

Chemist seems to be a little more stubborn.
Have we learned our lesson, boys and girls? Just go buy your contact lens solution and be done with it. Don't follow instructions on how to make your own solution from a website, even this one, unless you've had experience in mixing chemicals intended for use in the human body. Okay?
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  #26  
Old 01-29-2010, 02:19 PM
BettyBoop BettyBoop is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedeyeJedi View Post
Have we learned our lesson, boys and girls? Just go buy your contact lens solution and be done with it. Don't follow instructions on how to make your own solution from a website, even this one, unless you've had experience in mixing chemicals intended for use in the human body. Okay?
That's right, RedeyeJedi. You have to be very careful when working with unfamiliar things like peroxide and "sinus cleaning product." Especially when the potion you're mixing up may come into contact with your eyes.
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  #27  
Old 02-02-2010, 02:25 PM
herbking herbking is offline
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Default Why Else Give Step-By-Step Instructions?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Hi SandiStix

Yes, I absolutely agree with your post. As they say on some of these TV Programmes when someone does something apparently life threatening or dangerous, 'Remember folks. Don't try this at home'

I don't advise Mr or Mrs Average to go and make up their own lens solutions - in fact most couldn't be bothered. In the case of Daily Disposables, it isn't even necessary I guess.

But, yes, the warning is indeed valid. Point well made. Thanks.

knotlob
I only hope that people will read those words, Knotlob. There are so many people out there who, when they see how something is done the go right out and try it. That's kind of the implication when chemist posted his/her "recipe." "I've shown you how to do it. Now, go and do thou likewise."
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  #28  
Old 02-03-2010, 04:06 PM
jpeg4 jpeg4 is offline
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I'm not a trained chemist or anything but the neilmed nasal wash is just a saline mix and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is water after it's neutralized.

Quote:
What's in CIBA Vision “Clear Care”?

Clear Care lists the following ingredients: micro-filtered hydrogen peroxide 3%, sodium chloride 0.79%, stabilized with phosphonic acid, a phosphate buffered system, and Pluronic 17R4 (a cleaning agent).

In other words, it is 3% hydrogen peroxide, plus some salt (once the peroxide breaks down into water, this will make it saline solution, rather than just plain water) -- plus a stabilizer and a cleaning agent.

Source: http://www.using-hydrogen-peroxide.com/ciba-vision-clear-care.html
So with the right platinum catalyst case (Clear Care bottles) it just turns the mix from hydrogen peroxide into saline water. I think it's a safe mix because both materials are medical grade.

Of course do it as your own risk but neither salt or hydrogen peroxide are harmful if you handle it correctly.

But in the lab report Chemist posted it did mention that:
Quote:
However, use of homemade hydrogen peroxide contact lens disinfectant is not recommended as it can contain stabilizers such as phosphoric acid, acetanilide, phenacetin, and sodium stanate.
The report also mentioned that it's not recommend to store contacts in the homemade peroxide/saline solution since there's nothing in there to prevent acanthamoeba keratitis after peroxide is neutralized. Clear Care and other commercial peroxide solutions have other ingredients (Pluronic 17R4) to preserve the contacts after it's been neutralized. Also if the homemade peroxide mix neutralize too quickly it won't do its job correctly.

It's just some unbiased opinion (I hope) from the data that are provided.
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  #29  
Old 02-03-2010, 05:41 PM
Knotlob Knotlob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpeg4 View Post
I'm not a trained chemist or anything but the neilmed nasal wash is just a saline mix and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is water after it's neutralized.



So with the right platinum catalyst case (Clear Care bottles) it just turns the mix from hydrogen peroxide into saline water. I think it's a safe mix because both materials are medical grade.

Of course do it as your own risk but neither salt or hydrogen peroxide are harmful if you handle it correctly.

But in the lab report Chemist posted it did mention that:


The report also mentioned that it's not recommend to store contacts in the homemade peroxide/saline solution since there's nothing in there to prevent acanthamoeba keratitis after peroxide is neutralized. Clear Care and other commercial peroxide solutions have other ingredients (Pluronic 17R4) to preserve the contacts after it's been neutralized. Also if the homemade peroxide mix neutralize too quickly it won't do its job correctly.

It's just some unbiased opinion (I hope) from the data that are provided.
I was under the impression that the stabilisers/preservatives are not necessary in peroxide solutions. They are there to extend the life of the peroxide under adverse storage conditions before sale (temperature, etc).

I wouldn't normally store lenses in neutralised peroxide (saline solution) for any length of time and if I did, then I always give the lenses an overnight soak in 2 step peroxide solution, followed by neutralisation, before wearing them. I sometimes store lenses in unneutralised peroxide though.

It doesn't matter whether the single step (catalyst or catalase tablet) peroxide is home made or bought, the fact that it neutralises while it is supposed to be disinfecting, greatly diminishes it's effectiveness. It has not been shown to effectively kill Acanthamoeba bacteria. The preservatives will not kill the Acathamoeba bacteria.

knotlob
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  #30  
Old 02-03-2010, 08:44 PM
jpeg4 jpeg4 is offline
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Both AOSept and Clear View are made by the same company and the only difference is that AOSept lack the Pluronic 17R4 Clear View had. But AOSept require you to rinse the contacts with a cleaning solution before put it in the peroxide.

So do I need to rinse the contacts with a multipurpose solution before putting it in the homemade peroxide mix?
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  #31  
Old 02-04-2010, 04:47 AM
Knotlob Knotlob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpeg4 View Post
Both AOSept and Clear View are made by the same company and the only difference is that AOSept lack the Pluronic 17R4 Clear View had. But AOSept require you to rinse the contacts with a cleaning solution before put it in the peroxide.

So do I need to rinse the contacts with a multipurpose solution before putting it in the homemade peroxide mix?
OK, as posted earlier, I make my own peroxide solution, but use a shop bought catalase based neutraliser solution. I don't use any Multi Purpose Disinfectant solutions. I just put a couple of drops of neutraliser solution onto my (soft) lenses before putting them into my eyes.

Indeed, one of the benefits of using a one step peroxide system with a platinum/palladium catalyst disk is that there should be no other chemicals apart from saline solution, which may cause some folk an allergy problem. If you use a Multi Purpose Disinfectant solution in addition, this negates one major advantage of the one step peroxide system. i.e. some people are allergic, or have an adverse reaction to the preservatives in the Multi Purpose Disinfecting solution.

Presumably this is why Clear View and AOSept are offered as different products.

If you want to rinse your lenses afterwards, I suggest that initially you buy a bottle of sterile contact lens saline solution from your optician and rinse your lenses with that - see if that works OK. Using a Multi Purpose Disinfectant solution is a step backwards in my view. I use a saline solution to rinse my RGP lenses following cleaning.

The only reason I see for rinsing your lenses with another solution following peroxide disinfection would be if you had a problem with wetting the lenses/dry eyes and that second solution contained a wetting agent. But as said, I don't require it.

knotlob
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  #32  
Old 02-04-2010, 09:56 AM
lurker2010 lurker2010 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
Interesting post by Chemist.

Actually I have been making my own Hydrogen Peroxide solutions for over 20 years. I now buy 30% peroxide (strongest available) in Analar Grade (i.e. pharmaceutical grade). I dilute it to 3% (i.e. 1 part peroxide to 9 parts pure water). The water I am using is Ultra pure from chemical laboratories - much purer that the water that the Contact Lens Solution suppliers use to make the commercial stuff.
I'm sure it works for you. My concern would be the presence of contaminants in the peroxide solution purchased at Walmart. Could be an irritant to many people. I suspect far too many people would use tap water, or bottled water for dilution. Steam distilled water is probably the only safe water that's readily available and that's not cheap. The cost of purchasing an AOSept case (with platinum disk) suggests this solution will probably wind up costing more then purchasing generic MPS. I'm not even sure how much you'd save vs purchasing a store brand peroxide solution with case.

I'm not sure you can even easily purchase separate neutralizing solution.

People looking to save money should consider store brand solutions. Research using an ultrasonic cleaner. Research using a disposable lens for longer then suggested by the manufacturer.
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Old 02-04-2010, 11:08 AM
Knotlob Knotlob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lurker2010 View Post
I'm sure it works for you. My concern would be the presence of contaminants in the peroxide solution purchased at Walmart. Could be an irritant to many people. I suspect far too many people would use tap water, or bottled water for dilution. Steam distilled water is probably the only safe water that's readily available and that's not cheap. The cost of purchasing an AOSept case (with platinum disk) suggests this solution will probably wind up costing more then purchasing generic MPS. I'm not even sure how much you'd save vs purchasing a store brand peroxide solution with case.

I'm not sure you can even easily purchase separate neutralizing solution.

People looking to save money should consider store brand solutions. Research using an ultrasonic cleaner. Research using a disposable lens for longer then suggested by the manufacturer.
Hello Lurker

I accept most of your points but have th following comments:

There is NO dilution required if you buy 3% hydrogen peroxide. That's the strength that is used in the commercial contact lens peroxide solutions.

Don't know about WalMart peroxide purity without reading the label and it's intended use.

Ultrasonic cleaners will not kill bacteria as far as I know. They are sold to clean deposits off lenses, but you would have to exercise care not to damage the lenses with a heavy duty ultrasonic cleaner made for another purpose.

If you did use tap water (certainly not recommended) the peroxide would of course kill off any micro organisms, including Acanthamoeba kerititis if present. The inorganic and residues/by-products of the reacted inorganic & organic contaminants would of course remain.

I buy my peroxide at a chemist and specify analar grade. I do buy a much stronger peroxide, but that is potentially dangerous (it's very corrosive) and you do need to have pure water to dilute it. I have the training and access to the pure water. I don't recommend anyone without the required training to even think about making their own peroxide solutions.

You obviously don't want to use a peroxide that is used for example to clean algae from garden ponds (may contain contaminants like mercury, etc.) but if you explain to the chemist/pharmacist what you want to use it for, then they will guide you (provided you don't appear to be a complete idiot).

I do buy neutraliser - it easily available in Germany and the UK. It does sound like it is difficult to buy in the US. When I bought AOSept Catalyst disks previously, I found them expensive and they didn't last very long. That is yet another reason I prefer the neutraliser liquid.

Whether you save money making your own peroxide solution will depend on what the commercial solutions cost. In Germany, the commercial EyeSee peroxide/saline/neutraliser solutions are reasonable in cost and I still save a reasonable amount making my own. The other solutions AOSept are rather more expensive and where I lived previously (Ireland) they were a great deal more expensive.

The whole idea of using a single step peroxide system (AOSept) was to avoid the potential irritants found in some Multi Purpose Disinfection solutions. Not everybody is sensitive, but for those who are, Multi Purpose Disinfection solutions are not the way forward.

Most people should just stick to buying the commercial lens solution as recommended by their eye care specialist.

knotlob
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  #34  
Old 03-17-2010, 01:46 PM
herbking herbking is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knotlob View Post
I buy my peroxide at a chemist and specify analar grade. I do buy a much stronger peroxide, but that is potentially dangerous (it's very corrosive) and you do need to have pure water to dilute it. I have the training and access to the pure water. I don't recommend anyone without the required training to even think about making their own peroxide solutions.

knotlob
Does a person have to have special training and access like yourself in order to make their own contact lens solution? I thought the whole point of this thread was to tell Joe Average not to make his own solution and just buy it. Then "chemist" countered that Joe Average can very easily make his own solution and by so doing could "stick it to the man." So in conclusion, I'd like to ask you, knotlob, in your educated opinion:

1. Can a person randomly chosen among contact lens wearers make his own contact lens solution?

2. Should he?
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Old 03-17-2010, 02:34 PM
Knotlob Knotlob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herbking View Post
Does a person have to have special training and access like yourself in order to make their own contact lens solution? I thought the whole point of this thread was to tell Joe Average not to make his own solution and just buy it. Then "chemist" countered that Joe Average can very easily make his own solution and by so doing could "stick it to the man." So in conclusion, I'd like to ask you, knotlob, in your educated opinion:

1. Can a person randomly chosen among contact lens wearers make his own contact lens solution?

2. Should he?
No, not a person chosen at random, because some of the posters here don't know, or are not confident in their basic chemistry. Very few people are going to have access to pure water (I'm not talking of distilled water for topping up car batteries or putting into steam irons in hard water areas). If you buy 3% hydrogen peroxide then of course you won't need the pure water to dilute it, BUT you still need to ensure that you buy the correct purity AND concentration of hydrogen peroxide and add the correct amount of pure salt (NaCl) to the solution.

Overall, the average, or randomly chosen person should NOT make up their own solutions. (I only make up the peroxide solution, NOT the neutraliser or the saline solution - as I don't use saline very often and could not guarantee that it would be sterile. The peroxide solution will be sterile of course).

But for those who are qualified AND who also have access to ultra pure water if required, there is nothing technically difficult about making their own peroxide sterilising solution if they have the time and/or desire.

knotlob
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Old 03-17-2010, 07:08 PM
lurker2010 lurker2010 is offline
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The 3% hydrogen peroxide sold in the US (probably other countries) contain impurities that are intentionally added to improve stability and shelf life. You need to purchase technical or food grade hydrogen peroxide. You'll probably have to get it mail order (at least in the US). PP is correct. The average person is likely to either use store bought hydrogen peroxide and have possible issues with impurities or is likely to use the wrong water to dilute the right stuff.

In the US you can purchase store brand hydrogen peroxide solutions for contacts. It includes the lens case and platinum disk. Knotlob is able to purchase neutralizing solution in Europe. The net savings in the US is minimal (for most people).
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Old 08-26-2013, 10:27 AM
bluecitrusheart bluecitrusheart is offline
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I would like to point out that this is the exact procedure in which I have mixed my AOSept hydrogen peroxide cleaning solution. I have used this for months now and it is exactly the same as the hydrogen peroxide solution brands you buy for $7 at the store.

There is no difference between the brand solution and the homemade cleaning solution except for very minute ignorable differences in stabilizers and amount of sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate. When I say ignorable, I mean literally, so small of an amount you can't even trace or see it.

The sodium chloride is nothing but USP grade salt to make your saline solution. Sodium Bicarbonate exists in trace amounts to help maintain the pH level of the solution to keep them well adjusted with your natural body pH. Although, sometimes the H2O2 you buy in stores can already be adjusted in pH level accordingly to help with decomposition. Adding less or more (in minute PPM) in either of these elements, due to differences in manufacturing, packaging, and personal adjustments, does not widely affect the contacts or your eyes. They are ubiquitous elements within the household used in everyday cooking, cleaning, healthcare and disinfectant.

Stabilizers within the H2O2 include but is not limited to stannates, pyrophosphates, and organopyrophosphates, in sometimes, untraceable amounts. If you worry about the differences in stabilizers, I suggest buying high purity, low stabilizer H2O2; however, this means you will have to dilute the contents with pure lab grade H2O because companies usually sell pure H2O2 above 30%. Even in your store brand H2O2 cleaning solution, they will still add small amounts of stabilizers due to the decomposition nature of H2O2, which usually include phosphoric acid and often buffered with phosphates. If you use Clear Care, they also add Pluronic 17R4, a surfactant for cleaning. Don't let people lie to you when they say the store brand H2O2 has no chemicals. The only difference is the micro-filtering of the H2O2 brand versus the homemade H2O2.

Honestly, low stabilizer or high purity H2O2 should last quite a while. I've had a friend who forgot about a clear bottle of regular H2O2 outside in direct sunlight for four months. The solution still exploded violently when mixed with yeast in a confined bottle. (She was doing some science project for the kids). They usually tell you not to shake the bottle, or put in direct sunlight or heat. This is just for consideration and does not really affect the H2O2 tremendously.

If you wanted to know what would happen when you mix yeast and H2O2 just Google or YouTube it.

For extra measure, I clean my contacts with sterile saline solution and rub, to rid the contacts of the minute traces of stabilizers and H2O2 residue. Saline Solution can be bought in commercial amounts and much cheaper than multi-purpose solution. I think I bought Equate brand for $4 for two 32 Oz bottles. But they can definitely be worn right out of the catalase case because there is only saline solution remaining after the platinum catalyzing of H2O2.

This being said, I use contacts that I throw out weekly or biweekly. If you use monthly or even longer lasting contacts, I suggest you invest money in cleaning them with protein and oil surfactants or add another regimen to the cleaning process. Homemade H2O2 alone does not have enough cleaning potential for longer lasting contacts. I suggest just buying the multi-purpose or store brand AOSept H2O2 solution if you are wearing monthly or yearly contacts.


Best of luck,
Bluecitrusheart



Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
I have received a lot of email from folks thanking me for the information regarding a low cost soft-lens cleaning solution. some have reported that it has been difficult to get the exactly right amount of salt into the small lens cleaning case.

the following is a practical approach to making a large batch of an isotonic solution.

1) go to walmart and buy "neilmed" refill packets used in their sinus cleaning product. These are small packets, each with exactly the correct mix to produce an isotonic solution with 8oz of water. They are also USP ( U.S. pharmaceutical ) quality, which mean there a no contaminants. A box of 50 costs something like $8

2) while you are there, pick up a 32 oz. bottle of peroxide. for $0.88 - that's the big one.

3) also, smirk at the pre-made solutions that cost $10 or more for 16oz.

4) put 4 envelopes into the peroxide.

keep in your bathroom and use as needed in your lens cleaning case. ( this HAS TO be a case with a platinum catalyst )

keep in a cool, dark place ( under the sink.. )

this approach brings the cost down to $0.50 per 16oz. or 1/20 the cost of the pre-made solution.

bye for now.
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  #38  
Old 09-28-2013, 03:20 PM
scubudo scubudo is offline
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I stumbled across this site after my son asked the question.
While I don't even wear contacts, as a physician (but not an ophthalmologist) I think my opinion may be a little more educated than most.

I would doubt infection would be the biggest risk given the disinfection qualities of H2O2. Sure, you are using it to clean something that goes in your eye, but if the eye were so susceptible to infection that a cleaner could only be manufactured in a super clean environment (ie. one that could not be duplicated in the home setting), then we had best not even open our eye, especially not while swimming at the beach! Dirty salt water (not even the right concentration as .09% saline) filled with sand (to roughen up the old eye balls) and bacteria (that like to live in a saline environment). Of course, in reality (amazing as it may seem) our eyes usually deal with it just fine.
My educated guess is that Chemist is very likely correct on his formulation...and more than likely this can be done safely. More than likely this is safer than homemade saline solution (since there is nothing to sterilize, nor even really to measure). It probably is much safer than the practice of using that old open bottle of saline which everyone I know who wears contacts, usually has lying around..."just in case". My only real question would be the remote possibility of a preservative that may discolor or otherwise degrade the lens, or which could potentially cause some eye irritation.
So, for all of those doom and gloom predictors that posted about the risk of infection: don't get me wrong, such a risk is real but fortunately remote. By sticking to commercially available cleaners one does not even eliminate that risk. They simply shift some of the liability to someone else. So should you happen to be unlucky, you might be able to get some insurance money.
If you make your contact cleaner yourself, you don't have much recourse. However, that doesn't mean it can't be done, nor does it mean it is necessarily unsafe.
I am interested if anyone has tried this recipe and what results they noted.
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